2019 ARHE/ARS/AAPG Conference Schedule

2019 ARHE/ARS/AAPG Conference Schedule

Saturday, June 29th, 2019
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM: Exhibit Hall Set-up
Exhibit Hall Set-up Metcalf Hall & Ziskind Lounge (BU Exhibit Hall) George Sherman Union
8:00 AM - 4:00 PM: Registration Open
Registration Open Stone Lobby (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union Outside Exhibit Hall
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM: Pre-Conference Sessions
Molly Pitcher (Hyatt)
Collegiate recovery traditionally is meant to be accessible to any student who is seeking support to maintain recovery in a college setting, yet most collegiate recovery programming is overwhelmingly being utilized by students of Euro-American ancestry. Considering that the prevalence of Substance Use Disorder is virtually the same across racial, ethnic, and socio-economic groups it is critical that those who work in collegiate recovery explore the socio-political factors that may impact access to collegiate recovery as well as the implicit bias that may impact the staff's ability to attract students from marginalized populations to their programs.
William Dawes (Hyatt)
Join Tom Bannard, Program Coordinator for Virginia Commonwealth University's Rams in Recovery Program as he does a train the trainer for VCU's RecoveryAlly Program, a 3 hour training focused primarily on Faculty and Staff. More than 500 people have been trained in the past 24 months, and the program has helped increase campus resources, raise private funds for the recovery program, and started to shift elements of campus culture. This training can be adapted for Collegiate Recovery Programs, Recovery Community Organizations, cultural centers, and even businesses and churches.
Paul Revere (Hyatt)
Preventable drug overdose deaths have been on the rise nationwide. Opioids are the top cause of death from drug overdose. REVIVE! is Virginia's opioid overdose and naloxone education program and is part of the Commonwealth's response to the epidemic of opioid use and related deaths in Virginia. REVIVE! trains individuals to be prepared for, recognize, and respond to an opioid overdose emergency with the administration of Naloxone. Naloxone is a life-saving prescription medication that reverses the effects of an opioid overdose. This training will provide a better understanding of the REVIVE! Program. The training will identify risk factors that may make someone more susceptible to an opioid overdose emergency. Attendees will be able to dispel common myths about how to reverse an opioid overdose and will also learn how to respond to an opioid overdose emergency with the administration of naloxone.
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM: Lunch
Lunch Break (On Your Own)
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM: ARHE Breakout Sessions
Charles Riverview Ballroom (Hyatt)
During this interactive session, presenters will discuss lessons learned through working to support students with underrepresented identities and recovery support needs. Presenters will explore how CRPs can more effectively connect with and support students from diverse backgrounds. Presenters will share current research; discuss barriers from systemic, campus, programmatic and individual levels; and share promising practices for addressing barriers and developing the capacity of CRPs to serve all students that may benefit from on-campus recovery supports. Session participants will begin to identify opportunities for assessing and strengthening the capacity of their own programs to engage and support students with underrepresented identities.
Molly Pitcher (Hyatt)
The University of Southern Maine's Recovery Oriented Campus Center (ROCC) offers students in recovery a uniquely integrated program, blending recovery services for substance use and mental health disorders. The ROCC integrates programming to address co-occurring disorders, and independently occurring mental health and substance use disorders, under the common vision of recovery. The following presentation will introduce and describe our integrated peer recovery program, and the evidence supporting this model. Presenters include the collegiate recovery program coordinator and a student panel who will discuss the multiple pathways of recovery provided by the ROCC, and their experiences facilitating peer support groups.
Paul Revere (Hyatt)
Culture is defined by Webster's Dictionary as the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that characterizes an institution or organization. What are the shared values, goals, and practices that characterize a 'healthy' collegiate recovery or recovery high school student body? This presentation will unpack the core elements of collegiate recovery programs, recovery high schools, and recovery community organizations. What is the same? What are the differences? Why do CRP and RHS professionals need to understand these variances? The presenter will use her decade of experience working with each of these populations, including her time spent with the emergent recovery community in Ghana, West Africa, to provide attendees with an exciting and dynamic discussion of what is a cultural practice, and what is a red flag that you should be concerned about your recovery community. Learn how to predict unhealthy trends in students while providing a safe space for students to support one another. By setting clear standards for your students, based on recovery culture, academic performance, and developmental research, recovery community support staff can create a healthy environment for students to thrive.
William Dawes (Hyatt)
Although the relevance of forgiveness to addiction and recovery has received anecdotal support for some time, it has only recently begun to receive attention in the scientific literature. Empirical evidence is beginning to accumulate in support of the notion that multiple dimensions of forgiveness may play an important role in addiction and recovery. Moreover, that self-forgiveness may be the most important dimension of forgiveness in relation to full recovery. In this presentation, we will discuss the underpinnings of and current and future efforts regarding the science of forgiveness, addiction, and recovery, including implementation in the context of collegiate recovery.
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM: AAPG Breakout Sessions
Haym Saloman (Hyatt)
Alternative Peer Group Programs have honed treatment strategies and tactics to increase the likely positive outcome in recovery from substance use and co-occurring disorders. This enthusiastic recovery model has been successfully treating adolescents and young adults who struggle with substance use and mental health disorders in Houston for 45 years.
2:00 PM - 2:15 PM: Coffee Break
Coffee Break
2:15 PM - 3:15 PM: ARHE Breakout Sessions
Paul Revere (Hyatt)
Recovery science research is an evolving frontier, offering new opportunities to understand the ways and means by which people recover from substance use and other addictive disorders. Higher education is often the venue where sciences emerge and innovate, making collegiate recovery programs (CRPs) the prime arena for recovery science research. This presentation will review the ways in which CRPs can integrate research initiatives into everyday operations, utilizing the readily available resources on campus. Benefits of research initiatives- to CRP students, the program itself, and the broader university- will be reviewed.
Molly Pitcher (Hyatt)
Minding Your Mind presents the experience of a young adult with a substance use disorder and mental health struggles who is now living a successful and productive life. Through a professionally-crafted presentation that is educational and inspirational, the presenter challenges negative stereotypes by sharing her story of hope and recovery, raising awareness, and encouraging other to reach out for help. The presenter shares her experience of shifting from negative coping skills to engaging in treatment and her ongoing recovery. Ultimately, the presenter shares the experience of thriving with a substance use disorder while bringing awareness and hope to the issue.
William Dawes (Hyatt)
How do we define recovery…and from what? What philosophy fits best for a developing collegiate recovery program (CRP), given their unique circumstances and available resources? Determining program philosophy and practice is further complicated by the fact that there are vast differences among existing CRPs nationally, even those models well established and thriving. In this session, we will review multiple philosophical models for program development, examining the pros and cons of each, while considering and discussing ARHE standards and recommendations. We will also examine several CRP models throughout the country to inquire how they have handled these thorny issues.
2:15 PM - 3:15 PM: AAPG Breakout Session
Haym Saloman (Hyatt)
Building an Alternative Peer Group to treat adolescent and young adult substance use disorders and mental health issues in a new community requires very specific support from both the community and the staff who will be managing it. This presentation will offer an introduction to these challenges, a description of the support needed, and a discussion of the ways to avoid common pitfalls.
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM: ARHE Extended Breakout Sessions
Molly Pitcher (Hyatt)
The Collegiate Recovery Movement is at a time of intense growth. How have we achieved the successes, do we learn from our failures? How do we mobilize recovery supports to arrest the current addiction crisis? We need to help our communities become more inclusive, diverse and have representation from lived experience. Do we integrate our campus communities with community recovery communities? How can we address shifting attitudes towards the use of certain substances, (Juul, CBD, "medical" marijuana)? Students who are in medication assisted treatment (MAT): Do we develop guidelines and policies to effectively help people in recovery who embrace MAT?
Paul Revere (Hyatt)
To help attendees learn and acknowledge the gap in the continuum of care that exists when students are transitioning from an academic world to a professional world- and to present our solution on how to best support CRPA.
William Dawes (Hyatt)
Treatment is only the first step in the recovery process. Recovery is a lifelong endeavor and recovery support is a vital part of the continuum of care. How can we support people to build a life full of purpose and meaning? Presenters have condensed a body of knowledge that includes the Stages of Change, Stages of Recovery, SAMHSA's Eight Dimensions of Wellness & Four Dimensions that Support a Life in Recovery for anyone looking to create supportive communities. Throughout the session, success stories and case studies will be shared.
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM: AAPG Breakout Sessions
Haym Saloman (Hyatt)
Alternative Peer Groups provide a best-practice method of treating youth of suffer from substance use and mental health disorders that utilize positive peer influence to shape recovery norms. The research on Alternative Peer Groups is scant with only a few studies complete to date. This presentation will focus on the design and outcomes of these studies.
6:00 PM - 8:30 PM: ARHE Members Dinner & Town Hall Meeting
Charles Riverview Ballroom (Hyatt)
ARHE standards and recommendations were derived from decades of literature on adolescent and young adult substance use disorders (SUD) and the process of recovery, existing CRP literature, and practice. This session will provide an overview of ARHE standards and recommendations from a research, theory, and practice lens to enhance the understanding of, and justification for the standards and recommendations. ARHE standards and recommendations intend to promote the integrity of ARHE institutional members and support healthy growth and development within the field. These standard and recommendations serve to guide best practices and promote optimal student development.
Sunday, June 30th, 2019
7:30 AM - 9:00 AM: Breakfast in Exhibit Hall
Breakfast in Exhibit Hall Sponsored by The Haven at College Metcalf Hall & Ziskind Lounge (BU Exhibit Hall) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
7:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Registration Open
Registration Open Stone Lobby (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union Outside Exhibit Hall
7:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Exhibit Hall Open
Exhibit Hall Open Metcalf Hall & Ziskind Lounge (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
7:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Gratitude Lounge Open
Gratitude Lounge Open Terrace Lounge (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
7:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Recovery Room Open
Recovery Room Open Dean's Lounge (BU) 3rd Floor of George Sherman Union
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM: Leadership Academy Flash Presentations
Backcourt Dining (BU)
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM: ARHE Extended Breakout Sessions
Conference Auditorium (BU)
In this presentation, we will discuss our collaborative efforts with five collegiate recovery programs (CRPs) to analyze existing data on student outcomes with the following aims: (1) map how different CRPs currently measure student recovery and recovery capital; (2) examine student-level outcomes (e.g., social-emotional well-being) across multiple CRPs; and (3) explore whether different program components lead to different student outcomes. In addition to presenting preliminary findings, our presentation will involve discussion of how we collaborated with CRP staff at multiple sites to harness and synthesize existing data and how we hope these efforts will inform future data collection efforts.
Law Auditorium (BU)
"A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots." - Marcus Garvey

The development of recovery high schools and collegiate recovery programs over the past forty years has been extremely exciting but has not been an entirely smooth process at times. Where has our funding come from and where will it come from in the future? Who have been our silent supporters both in the public and private sectors? How can RHS's and CRP's build on the lessons learned by our forefathers? Presenters will take the attendees through a historical account of critical moments in the recovery high school and collegiate recovery evolution, moments that led us to where we are today. Join us for an exciting and dynamic conversation with three of the nation's most dedicated professionals. We have much to learn from our past and even more to look forward to in our future!
Conference Room 1 (BU)
Since 2006, The Phoenix's free sober active community has inspired more than 26,000 people across America to find freedom from substance use disorder. This session will introduce a new branch of Phoenix programming called Phoenix Ascension. It will explore the experiential and adventure-based practices used to create our prevention and recovery support programming for youth and young adults. Participants will learn how to utilize these practices when engaging these populations to foster community and increase self-efficacy. They will also gain insight on how to create programming and partnerships to enhance their existing prevention and recovery support services.
Conference Room 2 (BU)
Recognizing, understanding and addressing the impact of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) can play a key factor in supporting a sustained whole person recovery process. Participants in this session will review the categories of adverse childhood experiences, explore the connection between ACE and substance use/mental health disorders and learn strategies for both developing trauma informed practices and making informed referrals for evidence-based care modalities.
Conference Room 3 (BU)
Collegiate recovery research has historically been observational in nature, which has limited our ability to infer causal relationships between program participation and recovery outcome improvements. This session will provide attendees an update on the first multi-site, longitudinal study of collegiate recovery students in the United States. Theory, procedures, methods, and mid-progress results will be discussed, including barriers and obstacles to implementation.
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM: ARS Breakout Sessions
Haym Saloman (Hyatt)
This session will guide you through the step by step accreditation standards for running the business side of Recovery High Schools. Learn from the best as you navigate selecting the model, identifying leadership, energizing a Board of Directors, building community partners and much more.
Molly Pitcher (Hyatt)
Capacitype™ data and mapping services help groups and organizations build capacity for recovery in their communities. This session will provide attendees with an overview of Capacitype. Included will be a presentation on emerging insights from the broad efforts being made by researchers to create a unifying classification and access system for resources specific to prevention, early intervention, treatment, and recovery support services in the U.S.
Paul Revere (Hyatt)
In January 2017, Governor Andrew Cuomo began efforts to create New York's first Recovery High School through a partnership between Boards of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) and the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS). In this workshop, individuals responsible for designing New York's Recovery High School model will discuss building a recovery high school within existing alternative high school programs as a way to expedite development and implementation and promote sustainability. In addition, OASAS will provide information on the use of Medicaid in-community authority as a mechanism for funding treatment and recovery support services.
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM: AAPG Breakout Sessions
William Dawes (Hyatt)
All APG directors and lead counseling staff are invited to participate in this focus group, research study. APG researchers will gather APG leaders experience, lessons, and practical strategies developed for promoting strong pro-recovery social APG climates. A discussion regarding how to identify when groups become dysfunctional and approaches for maintaining pro-social, positive adolescent and young adult groups that sustain safety and nurture recovery. The goal of this research focus group is to develop safe and effective pro-recovery APGs.
10:00 AM - 10:30 AM: Coffee Break
Coffee Break Sponsored by Mountainside Treatment Center Exhibit Hall - Metcalf Hall & Ziskind Lounge (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM: ARS/AAPG Awards Ceremony
Law Auditorium (BU)
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM: Opening Keynote
Conference Auditorium (BU)
This session presents findings of a study of students in recovery conducted at The University of Colorado at Boulder, the University of Michigan, and Penn State, analyzing the discourses students adopt, co-opt, and discard to gain recognition as members of their Collegiate Recovery Programs. Findings show students shuffle between recovery discourses, discourses of the professional-managerial classes, and discourses of what it means to be "cool" in college. Students use these discourses to create multiple and contradictory identities, to resist their awkward social positioning, to pursue professional careers, and to resist college discourses that invite alcohol and other substance use.
Tsai Performing Arts Center (BU)
Drug addiction - i.e. severe substance use disorder - has long been viewed in America as a moral failing, a character flaw that can be punished into submission. For the last century, our nation's laws have attempted to curb drug use and addiction through the criminal justice system and other policies that take away the rights of people who are addicted and continue to use. Instead of reducing drug use, these punitive policies have directly created mass incarceration, destroyed communities, and propelled the nation's addiction crisis. Participants will learn common misperceptions about addiction and recovery, and to how to more effectively work with addicted clients. This workshop will examine drug policies and how the criminalization of drug use has stigmatized an illness, limited access to treatment, and overburdened our criminal justice system. The presenters will provide an overview of addiction science, the recovery process, and evidence-based treatment, as well barriers to effective treatment.
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM: Lunch
Lunch Break (On Your Own)
12:15 PM - 1:45 PM: Leadership Academy Commencement (Invite Only)
Terrace Lounge (BU)
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM: ARHE Breakout Sessions
Law Auditorium (BU)
Introducing the concept of abstinence-based recovery and peer support into a UK University. An overview of the Public Health England funded addiction treatment system, its continuum of care and the impact on Collegiate Recovery development in Teesside University. The challenges, quick wins and stalemates along the way.
Conference Room 1 (BU)
Established in 1970 in the spirit of students helping students, the University at Albany's nationally-recognized Middle Earth Peer Assistance Program offers students in recovery and their ally's opportunities to staff a hotline service and engage in peer-to-peer coaching and peer education under the auspices of academic credit-bearing courses and a student group infrastructure. This workshop will provide an overview of the program's development, how students in recovery serve as program leaders alongside their allies, and how the Middle Earth program supports academic success and leadership while providing support for students in recovery. Successes, challenges, and lessons learned will be highlighted.
Conference Auditorium (BU)
The increasing number of states that are legalizing marijuana, both for medical and recreational use, poses special challenges for AOD clinicians and prevention specialists who support CRPs. Many students, even those already in recovery, may view cannabis differently than other substances, while others believe it to be completely benign and non-addictive. In this presentation, we will explore how these changing laws, shifting student attitudes, increased cannabis potency and the proliferation of vaping, can complicate clinical work on college campuses, and how treatment professionals can modify their own scripts to more effectively reach students whose cannabis use has become problematic.
Conference Room 3 (BU)
Families often experience confusion and feel overwhelmed as they look for resources for their loved ones post treatment. Many report turning to the internet, and may not end up with appropriate placement, or even know about the resources CRCs provide. Presenters review how to best support collaboration between treatment programs, CRCs, interventionists and referral sources, and explore the question of what role the therapeutic educational consulting community could play to improve placements into programs that address the unique needs of individuals and families seeking recovery programs and services.
Backcourt Dining (BU)
The Youth Recovery Network is creating an integrated recovery-oriented system of care that will result in better access to services and support for adolescents and emerging adults. This centralized resource for youth and their families will help steer those in need toward appropriate local resources and improve their ability to navigate behavioral health systems and ongoing recovery support. YRN's efforts include referral and navigation support to services for youth and their parents; creating an interconnected community of recovery supports for youth through a shared data system; promoting cross-sector alignment through convening and information sharing; and supporting recovery by connecting peers.
Paul Revere (Hyatt)
The proposed presentation will discuss Collegiate Recovery Communities (CRCs) and the scientific support regarding why they are successful. Specific risks associated with emerging adults will be detailed. A brief history of the founding of CRCs and growth to current day will also be discussed. Lastly, the presentation reviews the association of CRCs within the continuum of care and details current scientific findings on collegiate recovery.
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM: Roundtable
Conference Room 2 (BU)
The Recovery Capital for Adolescents Model (RCAM) is framework for identifying assets to enhance and barriers to address in supporting youth's recovery. We will present the model and use findings from a secondary analysis of qualitative interviews with adolescents who were actively involved in an APG to illustrate the RCAM's framework and domains. Then we will detail strategies that APGs and other recovery support models can use to address recovery barriers and build recovery assets for youth with substance use disorders.
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM: ARS Breakout Sessions
Molly Pitcher (Hyatt)
Using the Recovery Community ARS Accreditation Standards as a framework, this session will focus on how to create, maintain, and grow community within a recovery school Target population, enrollment diversity, transition planning and support, climate and culture, parent engagement, and sensitivity to differences will be the topics covered as part of this discussion which will provide participants with strategies and practices to take back to their school communities.
William Dawes (Hyatt)
The role of peer professionals and recovery coaches within the context of recovery high schools will be explored in an interactive format during this session designed to help attendees envision the position in their own recovery high schools. The goal of the session is to get participants to start thinking critically about what it would be like to incorporate a recovery coach into their own school, and some of the challenges that might arise.
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM: AAPG Breakout Sessions
Session Title: APG Pitfalls Panel
Haym Saloman (Hyatt)
Opening and maintaining an APG can be the most rewarding endeavor a treatment person can ever do. However, there are pitfalls that can stymie the effort and cause unnecessary problems for the staff and clients. This panel is made up of seasoned professionals from management, implementation, and development. They bring 50 years of knowledge of some of these pitfalls and how to deal with them. This session will also provide an opportunity to address some high-level questions from the attendees and a springboard for creating the beginning notes for the planning breakout sessions to follow.
2:30 PM - 2:50 PM: Coffee Break
Coffee Break Sponsored by Mountainside Treatment Center Exhibit Hall - Metcalf Hall & Ziskind Lounge (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
2:50 PM - 3:50 PM: ARHE Breakout Sessions
Conference Auditorium (BU)
This session will examine the impact of internet pornography, how this can become addictive, and how the new generation of pornography is impacting individuals, relationships and society.
Law Auditorium (BU)
During this interactive session, the presenter will provide an evolutionary frame to differentiate self-esteem and self-compassion. He will further explain the negative effects of social comparison, the fallacy of perfection, and explain self-criticism from an alternative perspective. Using neuroscience, the facilitator will also explain what brain structures are involved in this process. Participants will be able to evaluate their own level of self-compassion using an empirical instrument developed by Dr. Neff. Using the results from this self-assessment, participants will be able to identify areas of improvement. The facilitator will provide exercises in the presentation to enhance these skills during and after the session.
Conference Room 2 (BU)
Getting Your Self Together (GYST) is a self-development system designed to empower individuals in substance use and or mental health recovery into building and sustaining their own personal version of a fulfilling life. The GYST system comes with a guide through this process: the GYST Workbook. Another component is a mentor; this mentor would be someone that would meet in a peer style and discuss challenges, accomplishments, action steps and self-care while keeping a holding environment of accountability. GYST empowers individuals to build their own skillset by using the workbook and mentoring feedback to help them stay on track in their recovery and beyond. Developing healthy momentum when progressing through the continuum of care can boost the personal autonomy a peer needs to create their own healthy life course trajectory. GYST can help with this process.
2:50 PM - 3:50 PM: Roundtable
Conference Room 1 (BU)
My presentation is part of a larger social justice movement to build supportive environments for formerly incarcerated students in colleges and universities nationally. I see the ban the box issue as an important and necessary first step to increase equitable access to college education. I hope to provide the tools and resources to disseminate this policy and support formerly incarcerated students and professors to engage in policy making and lobbying around this issue. I also hope to build a larger platform that includes multiple policies that support people with convictions to promote success in higher education beyond admission.
Conference Room 3 (BU)
An initial study by Beason, Ryding et al. indicated that Recovery Zone training can reduce stigma and increase ally behavior on college campuses. Several schools across the country have launched Recovery Zone or Recovery Ally Trainings in order to increase campus Recovery Capital. These trainings educate groups on substance use disorders, give tools for supporting people in recovery, provide resources, reduce stigma, and improve bystander intervention skills. This roundtable will provide an overview of the program at Virginia Commonwealth University, resources to start your own program and an opportunity for collaboration and conversation with individuals providing these trainings.
William Dawes (Hyatt)
Recovery Housing is increasingly viewed as a viable and cost-effective alternative to established recovery-oriented systems of care. Studies show that higher education improves a person's quality of life. For people who are newly sober, recovery housing can provide time and support as they learn how to sustain long-term recovery. Affordable sober living for many is an issue. Those who are fortunate enough to find affordable sober living rarely pursue higher education. How do we bridge this gap? How do we introduce Collegiate Recovery to these individuals? In this session we will discuss how to incorporate higher education into sober living
2:50 PM - 3:50 PM: ARS Breakout Sessions
Paul Revere (Hyatt)
Recovery high schools (RHS) provide a supportive environment for students subsequent to treatment for substance use disorders. This analysis estimates the incremental impacts of RHSs using data from a multi-site study that followed RHS students and a comparison group of students discharged into other high school settings. Two beneficial impacts of statistical and substantive importance were identified: increased probability of high school graduation and increased sobriety. These findings suggest that RHSs are an efficient use of social resources.
Molly Pitcher (Hyatt)
Recovery High Schools are a unified education model of academics and recovery. Learn what the RHS accreditation standards can teach you about measuring student recovery, creating recovery culture/climate, and how to create a comprehensive recovery support program embedded into the every fabric of the school.
2:50 PM - 3:50 PM: AAPG Breakout Sessions
Haym Saloman (Hyatt)
This session will look at how recovery support disparity was created in diverse populations, how to assess the needs of a community, and how to design a curriculum that works for the community.
3:00 PM - 5:00 PM: Building a Strong Collegiate Recovery Program: Learning Community Networking Session
Backcourt Dining (BU)
Participants in the 2018-2019 BRSS TACS Building a Strong Collegiate Recovery Program Learning Community are encouraged to enjoy an opportunity for informal networking with the learning community, your working group, and your working group leader. Our time together will offer an opportunity to connect over fun snacks, trivia time to get to know each other better, and vision-casting as we strive to continue moving forward in our CRP development. We look forward to face-to-face connection and information sharing with all of you. Bring your ideas, your questions, and most importantly, bring yourselves!
3:50 PM - 4:10 PM: Coffee Break
Coffee Break Sponsored by Mountainside Treatment Center Exhibit Hall - Metcalf Hall & Ziskind Lounge (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
4:10 PM - 5:10 PM: ARHE Breakout Sessions
Conference Auditorium (BU)
Research repeatedly demonstrates the strong association between addictive behavior and trauma, highlighting the importance of a neurobiological understanding of traumatic sequelae to effectively treat substance use disorders. Neuroscience research demonstrates how traumatic experiences result in increased sympathetic nervous system activation and inhibition of the prefrontal cortex. Therefore, methods that rely on learning and cognitive behavioral skills without first addressing chronic nervous system dysregulation are limited and ultimately flawed. This presentation will describe pertinent trauma-related neurological limitations and demonstrate mind-body interventions that focus on increasing nervous system regulation and affect tolerance to facilitate learning and application of important recovery behaviors.
Law Auditorium (BU)
The University of Alabama's Collegiate Recovery and Intervention Services staff will present an in-depth look at their prevention, intervention, and collegiate recovery programming, examining how they reduce stigma, provide campus outreach and implement high-impact practices for all students and family members affected by substance use disorders. Audience members will learn from UA's experience and gain a new reference that can help them create a theoretical framework that best serves their institution's needs.
Conference Room 1 (BU)
This interactive presentation looks at poetry as a form of expressive therapy and site of empowerment. The presenter will briefly perform original pieces, then together with the audience will engage the work of contemporary poets writing about addiction and recovery. After briefly reviewing literary devices like imagery and metaphor, the second half of the session will consist of a live creative writing workshop focusing on the themes of recovery and community. Designed for all skill levels, participants will walk out with a small poem of their own.
Conference Room 2 (BU)
The management of a personal recovery identity while working within the broad field of recovery science provides unique challenges. Entry-level addiction recovery professionals, as well as CRP front-line staff, may receive no formal training to navigate the nuances of when to lean on their personal recovery. Assumptions surrounding the role that self-disclosure of a recovery status can have with clients/students can be misleading. Emerging science supports the application of measurement-based approaches to better understand how our own clinical practices influence our clients/students. Attendees will explore issues surrounding self-disclosure of a recovery identity and identify research-based suggestions to improve therapeutic effectiveness.
Conference Room 3 (BU)
Many practitioners support efficacy with recovering clients by focusing on the improvements in their lives in recovery. At a treatment level, patient reported measures are increasingly viewed as important, warranting research into the role of " health related quality of life" (QoL) in recovery. The session¬ focuses on the QoL outcome for people in recovery by examining the relationship between reported changes in "quality of life" in recovery and talking about drinking, both to others and to oneself. The session includes exploratory research on an analysis of 12 Step collegiate recovery stories, as well as an experiential demonstration.
4:10 PM - 5:10 PM: Roundtable
Paul Revere (Hyatt)
CRPs play an important role for students in recovery and warrant rigorous outcome data. These data are vital in order to underscore the value of CRPs. In our work with CRPs on research endeavors, we have had many discussions on data collection and management. These experiences with these data, as well as our experience evaluating recent published work have elucidated areas of discussion as we all strive to produce quality work. Our roundtable will focus on ways to improve research tools by discussing what factors are useful to measure, different ways of measuring, and other questions of interest.
4:10 PM - 5:10 PM: ARS Breakout Sessions
Molly Pitcher (Hyatt)
RHS are a unique balance of education and recovery. They are high functioning academic campuses that have special factors to consider. In this session you'll learn about academic curriculum, teacher professional development, special education services, and data driven instruction.
William Dawes (Hyatt)
The foucs of this session will be to review key strategies that can be implemented to sustain recovery high schools after the beginning of operations. Business planning, board and leadership development, community relations, advocacy and fundraising will be areas covered during this session. Participants be provided tools and resources that they can used to develop and grow their individual school sustainability plans.
4:10 PM - 5:10 PM: AAPG Breakout Sessions
Haym Saloman (Hyatt)
Effective treatment of adolescents can only have lasting effects if the family recovers along with the adolescent, healing old wounds, bridging the barriers formed by years of dysfunction, and learning to trust. This presentation offers an overview of the major issues in family programs and strategies to address them.
6:00 PM - 9:00 PM: 2019 Collegiate Recovery Awards
2019 Collegiate Recovery Awards at Fenway Park
Monday, July 1st, 2019
7:30 AM - 9:00 AM: Breakfast in Exhibit Hall
Breakfast in Exhibit Hall Sponsored by The JHW Foundation Metcalf Hall & Ziskind Lounge (BU Exhibit Hall) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
7:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Registration Open
Registration Open Stone Lobby (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union Outside Exhibit Hall
7:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Exhibit Hall Open
Exhibit Hall Open Metcalf Hall & Ziskind Lounge (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
7:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Gratitude Lounge Open
Gratitude Lounge Open Terrace Lounge (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
7:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Recovery Room Open
Recovery Room Open Dean's Lounge (BU) 3rd Floor of George Sherman Union
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM: ARHE Extended Breakout Sessions
Conference Auditorium (BU)
While outcome evaluation studies of CRPs have been published in the past, no efficiency evaluations have yet entered the literature, representing a critical gap. Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is one method for evaluating the efficiency of health-related programs, resulting in a cost per unit of health outcome, in this case, additional years of life from the societal perspective or student retention from the perspective of universities. This presentation shares the results of a comprehensive CEA of a CRP modeled from two national datasets, and will introduce a Toolkit for advocates to conduct their own institution-specific analyses.
Backcourt Dining (BU)
Collegiate recovery programming, by fostering the development of personal and institutional recovery capital, can create a trauma-informed, recovery-sensitive environment. This presentation will explore how recovery capital can be created, expanded, and supported by recovery peers in concert with faculty, staff, and administrations at institutions of higher education via a prototype of collegiate recovery programming. Concurrently, this will develop recovery-competent educators. Access to education builds recovery capital for underrepresented populations including people in recovery from substance use disorder. Additionally, recovery programs can map the development of recovery capital onto other campus-wide growth processes to build a broader, inclusive coalition of students.
Law Auditorium (BU)
Co-hosted by ARHE and S.A.F.E. Project (Stop the Addiction Fatality Epidemic), the Collegiate Recovery Leadership Academy is a fellowship program for any college student who is passionate about the intersection of collegiate recovery, leadership, and service. This session will provide mid-year updates on the outcomes for participating students in the first year of the project. Insights from available results will also be discussed with attendees, including practical takeaways to inform future professional development programming in collegiate recovery programs across the country.
Conference Room 1 (BU)
Initiated by suicide loss survivors from around the country, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) has led the fight against suicide for over thirty years through education, research, suicide loss support and advocacy. In this session, participants will learn how to advocate for mental health improvements, including recovery services and suicide prevention. The great news is, in Washington DC, mental health, substance use and suicide prevention are nonpartisan issues and change is happening, albeit, slowly. Come learn about the advances made in mental health and join the AFSP and other similar organizations who are leading the way in advocacy.
Conference Room 2 (BU)
This presentation addresses how grief, loss, and the understanding of fears related to death can complicate both the onset and maintenance of addiction recovery; and can present challenges for the counselor due to his or her unexpressed grief. Learning objectives include analyzing how grief interacts with substance use, addiction recovery, and relapse; explaining dynamics contributing to unexpressed or long-term grief; delineating the roles of resolution and acceptance in the grieving process; and examining the value of utilizing a Grief Graph. Attendees will be challenged to examine any personal process that could be interfering with clinical work regarding grief.
Conference Room 3 (BU)
A 60-minute Round Table discussion for higher education faculty and staff to augment their understanding of the complexities of the interactions of early recovery from active substance use disorder (SUD), the age-appropriate process of individuation from the family of origin and executive function challenges resulting from or exacerbated by their SUD. The program will provide the participant with an understanding of a proven multifaceted continuum of care that supports the client to concurrently establish a sustainable recovery and successfully perform academically.
Crispus Attucks (Hyatt)
For many students in recovery, developing a new understanding of one's identity, while contending with identities from the past, including delayed or missed opportunities in education, can make developing a college student identity a more complicated process. Students who feel a sense of belonging and purpose are more likely to thrive and persist. Presenters will share a recovery capital building strategy that can be used on any campus including those that are neutral or recovery hostile. Examples will include mapping one's academic discipline to broaden a sense of connection to their field of study and build relevant experiences and relationships.
Paul Revere (Hyatt)
Experiential Interventions in Substance Use Disorder Treatment: Engaging Emerging Adults is an introduction and explanation of experiential interventions and a review of their efficacy with emerging adult patients in substance use disorder treatment. This interactive presentation reviews obstacles to engagement for this population and their families, treatment goals, and the experiential clinical modalities that have proven effective for them. Examples include: equine-assisted counseling, art therapy, play therapy, music therapy, and therapeutic rituals. Case vignettes are used to highlight the efficacy of these modalities.
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM: ARS Breakout Sessions
Molly Pitcher (Hyatt)
Alternative Peer Groups provide a best-practice method of treating youth of suffer from substance use and mental health disorders that utilize positive peer influence to shape recovery norms. Archway Academy has successful sustained their recovery school model by integrating with local Alternative Peer Groups to provide prosocial support before and after school.
William Dawes (Hyatt)
Attendees will understand the unique role of the family in supporting both academic and recovery success for recovery high school students and strategies to engage families in a recovery school's culture in active and meaningful ways. In particular, an overview of the community reinforcement and family training (CRAFT) model will be provided.
Thomas Paine (Hyatt)
This session will cover our group's experience in building a new recovery high school program in an area where a youth recovery network is sparse and, in some cases, non-existent. It will cover barriers such as the lack of local resources, limited community awareness of the scope of substance use, alcohol use, and mental health issues that face our adolescents, and pervasive, stigmatized beliefs within the community. We will share our solutions including the identified partners and key stakeholders that may be able to help weave a youth recovery network as we work together toward an operational recovery high school.
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM: AAPG Breakout Sessions
Haym Saloman (Hyatt)
This session will cover how to identify various stakeholders in the APG model and teach strategies for creating relationships with stakeholders to further the mission of APGs through the review of two case studies exposing the pitfalls and successes with managing stakeholder relationships. Ultimately, participants will learn approaches for maintaining relationships with
stakeholders for long-term support.
10:00 AM - 10:30 AM: Coffee Break
Coffee Break Sponsored by Alkermes Exhibit Hall - Metcalf Hall & Ziskind Lounge (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM: Recovery Research Keynote
Tsai Performing Arts Center (BU)
Quality of life and psychological well-being are increasingly being recognized as important factors in and outcomes of substance use treatment. Scant research, however, has addressed if and how these factors could successfully be targeted by interventions to support addictive behavior change. Empirically developed positive psychology exercises exist. In other health behavior change settings, interventions that leverage positive psychology interventions to support behavioral change are increasingly being developed. This body of research, however, has made little impact on the field of addiction. To address this gap, this presentation will share findings from two studies that leverage happiness exercises to support addictive behavior change: a randomized survey study, administered online, that tested if self-administered positive psychology exercises could impact happiness in 531 adults seeking or in recovery from problematic substance use; and a pilot study testing the feasibility of using these exercises to support smoking cessation as administered via a smartphone app.
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM: Athletics and Recovery: A Critical Intersection
Law Auditorium (BU)
College campuses are home to a variety of unique student populations requiring certain accommodations to help the student best succeed. Whether it's veterans, LGBTQ+ students, first generation students, students in recovery, or student athletes- certain support structures need to be in place within the college environment. This session will gather a diverse pool of athletes to talk about an often overlooked intersection: athletics and recovery. What is it like being an athlete in recovery from addiction? What can we be doing better?
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM: Lunch
Lunch Break (On Your Own)
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM: Lunch Speaker: Former NBA Player Chris Herren
Lunch Speaker: Former NBA Player Chris Herren Bring Your Own Lunch! Conference Auditorium (BU)
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM: ARHE Breakout Sessions
Conference Auditorium (BU)
Building recovery capital on college campuses is crucial to the success of students in recovery. In an effort to provide services that are broad, holistic, and inclusive, it is important that collegiate recovery centers and programs exhaust any and all potential resources; which include resources that support and assist students seeking faith or religious elements in their recovery. To do this, collegiate recovery programs should be aware of the how the church can hurt people in recovery, how they can help people in recovery, and how they can educate and collaborate with local churches to better serve those in recovery.
Law Auditorium (BU)
Our presentation will be an effort to shine a spotlight on a social justice issue that is rarely discussed and almost never recognized. Many people are unaware of the definition of ableism and subsequently can not easily recognize its' far reaching implications. Similarly, many individuals are also often not aware of its harmful effects. We will be delivering a message of love and compassion for our fellow humans who are differently abled, held down by society, and uniquely impacted by unfortunate circumstances of life.
Conference Room 1 (BU)
When a loved one struggles with addiction families tend to focus their energy and attention on getting that person well. Most believe that if their loved one finds help, then everyone else will be okay. Many family members can see the negative impact and consequences of addiction on their loved ones, but find it difficult to see the depth of how they've been affected. This session will look at ways families are affected by the disease of addiction, and how to overcome the obstacles that stand in the way of families finding support for themselves.
Conference Room 2 (BU)
This program describes the benefits of a creative collaboration between a university recreation center and a collegiate recovery community. As a student-centered support service, the collegiate recovery community (CRC) acknowledges the importance of a holistic approach in early and ongoing recovery. Partnering with the student recreation center engages CRC members with multiple domains of wellbeing that are known to enhance and support recovery. This presentation highlights the impact of a campus resource on physical activity, joy and fun in a community of students in recovery. Assessment data and video to inspire will be shared.
Conference Room 3 (BU)
Twelve-step fellowships are free, found everywhere, and available any time of the day or week when professional services are not available. Research supports the recovery benefits of 12-step involvement for adults and youth. Yet less than 1% of AA and NA's members are under age 21. This presentation gives an overview of 12-step research and presents findings from a qualitative research study that explored adolescent Alternative Peer Group participants' experience and perceptions of the 12-steps' role in supporting their recovery (or not). Implications for addressing barriers and promoting adolescents' 12-step involvement will be discussed.
Backcourt Dining (BU)
Working with young adults possess a myriad of challenges. One of these is the navigating the muddy waters of self-disclosure. "Are you in recovery?" is often one of the first questions a new client will ask when entering treatment. In the age of de-stigmatizing SUDs and Mental Health Diagnosis how much should we share as addiction professionals? In this round table we will discuss the difference between para-professional roles and those of licensed clinicians and identify how self-disclosure is used in these different roles. We discuss the pros and cons of disclosure as a counselor as well as the theoretical and historical roots.
Crispus Attucks (Hyatt)
Many young adults who struggle with Substance Use Disorders and other co-occurring disorders lack the tools and capacity to cope with the demands of recovery and other life challenges. As a result, parents often fill in the gaps of their young adults' functioning and unwittingly promote continued dysfunction and regression. This session discusses how to engage parents in the treatment and recovery process and the relevant information and support they need to stop "over-functioning" and instead, focus on family recovery.
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM: Roundtable
Paul Revere (Hyatt)
This session will explore the need to address trauma in recovery, decreasing the effects of past trauma and preparing for inevitable future trauma, while growing along the recovery path through resiliency. Prior to and during addiction, recovering individuals have often encountered trauma. Left silent, trauma can lead to reduced life fulfillment, return to use, or suicidal tendencies. Trauma is associated with risk of suicide, with recurrent traumatic episodes leading to increased threat of suicidal tendencies. In this interactive session, participants will consider types of trauma that recovering individuals may have experienced and how trauma can interfere with solid recovery practices.
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM: ARS Breakout Sessions
Molly Pitcher (Hyatt)
This session will explore the different types of resources and trainings necessary to support and develop teachers in recovery high school environments. As part of this workshop we will review best strategies and tools that can be used by recovery high schools to support this work including but not limited to:

-Professional development
-Curriclum
-Characteristic of adolescents in early recovery and Pedagogical approaches
-Staff meeting protocols
-Self Care
William Dawes (Hyatt)
Recruitment and retention are two of the greatest challenges facing recovery schools and their sustainability. Schools are often challenged with balancing adequate enrollment with appropriate enrollment. This session will assist new and existing Recovery High School programs in assessing whether a student is an appropriate fit for the recovery high school environment.
Thomas Paine (Hyatt)
The Harris County Department of Education has created a public recovery high school committed to providing students with a high-quality education in a sober environment while supporting their recovery from substance use disorders. Participants will reflect on their current practices of how they educate and support these students and engage with the presenters around their journey. Participants will explore strategies and resources available.
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM: AAPG Breakout Sessions
Haym Saloman (Hyatt)
We will walk together through attachment theory as it applies to peer recovery support programs and open up the dialogue on how to engage teens and young adults through a lasting alliance with peers and providers.
2:30 PM - 2:50 PM: Coffee Break
Coffee Break Sponsored by Alkermes Exhibit Hall - Metcalf Hall & Ziskind Lounge (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
2:50 PM - 4:30 PM: Conference Keynote: TED-Style Advocacy Talks
Tsai Performing Arts Center (BU)
Advocacy has been a part of the development of collegiate recovery and recovery high schools since their inception. Historically, efforts have been focused on raising awareness about recovery and creating spaces that acknowledge the important role recovery plays in an individual's life. As these supports continue to grow, it is also important for our communities to embrace inclusion and diversity. These TED-Style talks will bring some of those issues to the stage.
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM: Exhibit Hall Reception
Exhibit Hall Reception Sponsored by The Ranch at Dove Tree Metcalf Hall & Ziskind Lounge (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
Tuesday, July 2nd, 2019
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM: Breakfast in Exhibit Hall
Breakfast in Exhibit Hall Metcalf Hall & Ziskind Lounge (BU Exhibit Hall) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
8:00 AM - 11:00 AM: Exhibit Hall Open
Exhibit Hall Open Metcalf Hall & Ziskind Lounge (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
8:00 AM - 11:00 AM: Gratitude Lounge Open
Gratitude Lounge Open Terrace Lounge (BU) 2nd Floor of George Sherman Union
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM: ARS Position Papers
Session Title: ARS Position Papers
Conference Auditorium (BU)
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM: ARS Closing Session
Session Title: ARS Closing Session
Conference Auditorium (BU)
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM: ARHE Extended Breakout Sessions
Law Auditorium (BU)
Virtually all (94%) young adults ages 18-29 own a smartphone and 9/10 participate on social network sites (SNSs) like Instagram and Facebook. These digital technologies are being leveraged to address substance use disorder (SUD), and to support individuals in SUD recovery. At the same time, mainstream college students are likely to interact with pro-substance content on messaging applications (e.g., Snapchat) and SNSs, leading potentially to increased substance use. In this roundtable of clinical researchers who work at the intersection of technology and SUD recovery, we apply these findings to collegiate recovery students, discuss their implications, and offer scientifically/clinically-based recommendations.
Conference Room 2 (BU)
Research shows that 30% of individuals with a substance use disorder (SUD) will also have an eating disorder (ED). With this evidence, collegiate recovery programs (CRPs) that primarily support substance use disorders will find that it is also important to provide support for individuals with ED. KSU and TTU advocate for inclusivity in CRPs by supporting students in eating disorder recovery. Presenters will discuss features of their programs including their successes and areas of growth. Presentation will include collegiate recovery students personal experience of what it is like to be in recovery from an ED in a CRP.
Conference Room 1 (BU)
Shame, scarcity (the "not enough" problem), comparison, and criticism run rampant in our heads. This session will speak to the implementation of Dr. Brené Brown's Daring Greatly™ curriculum in clinical programming with students in early recovery. We will discuss shame resiliency, how to conceptualize college as a place where students can learn to show up, be seen, and live brave™ in their recovery; and how to re-author their stories to be one of courage through vulnerability. Attendance at this event does not mean participants have been trained in The Daring Way™.
Backcourt Dining (BU)
Since 2011, Texas Tech University (TTU) Residence Life has supported students in recovery who are members of the Center for Collegiate Recovery Communities (CCRC). The staff in Residence Life have provided CCRC students a dedicated space so recovering students could reside with their peers. This workshop will present how the collaboration between the CCRC and residence life has been highly effective and vital for students who are in our program. During the workshop, recovery housing peer leaders, and CCRC staff will share the importance of fostering relationships within the university and the successes of this joint effort.
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM: AAPG Breakout Sessions
Session Title: Enthusiastic Recovery
Conference Room 3 (BU)
Addiction is serious. Treatment is serious. Parents are terrified, angry, perplexed. This is a nightmare for the developmentally zany teens who are wired for fun and yet overwhelmed by shame, fear, anger, and more shame. They feel that they have forfeited childhood. Their ideas of fun are intertwined with using drugs or drinking alcohol, and that is lost. If we can't teach them that they are exactly perfect being what teens are built to be, and that fun has nothing to do with drugs or alcohol (which they come to realize weren't really fun) we are failing them.
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM: Closing Keynote: ARHE Members' Choice
Tsai Performing Arts Center (BU)
Collegiate recovery has traditionally been abstinence-based and has served almost exclusively students of Euro-American ancestry. Those who manage and participate in collegiate recovery programs believe in the value of inclusion, and know that the "war on drugs" has done irreparable harm to people of color. By broadening the definition collegiate recovery to include harm reduction and multiple pathways to recovery there is an opportunity to create a more diverse recovery community, engage students in a recovery affirming community, and establish a more holistic approach to achieve wellness.