2018 ARHE/ARS/AAPG Conference Schedule

2018 ARHE/ARS/AAPG Conference Schedule

Monday, July 9th, 2018
6:30 AM - 7:30 AM: Morning Yoga at Campus Rec Center
Morning Yoga at Campus Rec Center--- Located at 4500 University Drive. About 5 minute walk from Student Center.
7:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Gratitude Lounge Open
Gratitude Lounge--- Located in the Skyline Room. Lounge Pass Required.
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM: Registration Open
Registration Open--- Located Outside of the Conference Exhibit Hall (Houston Room). On the 2nd Floor of the UH Student Center.
8:00 AM - 8:00 PM: Recovery Room Open
Recovery Room--- Located in the Astrodome Room. Meeting Schedule can be found at registration desk, online, or in the room.
8:00 AM - 8:45 AM: Student Ambassador Meet & Greet Breakfast- Sponsored by The Ammon Foundation
Student Ambassador Meet & Greet Breakfast- Sponsored by The Ammon Foundation--- Located in the Gratitude Lounge. Invite Only.
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM: Conference Breakfast
Conference Breakfast--- Located in the Exhibit Hall. Also served in the Collegiate Recovery Showcase Room.
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM: Exhibit Hall Set Up
Exhibit Hall Set Up--- Located in the Houston Room.
9:00 AM - 9:15 AM: Opening Remarks
Opening Remarks for the Recovery Research Summit--- Located in the Student Center Theater.
9:15 AM - 10:15 AM: Morning Keynote Presentation
Theater
The concept of "recovery" has become the organizing paradigm in many middle and high income countries globally with a goal of orienting services in cost effective ways to help sufferers achieve and maintain long term remission. Despite this focus, little is known from an epidemiological and public health perspective about the prevalence, pathways, and predictors of recovery, and the changes that ensue in quality of life and functioning with time in recovery. Using data from the recent National Recovery Study (NRS; Kelly et al, 2017), this talk will review a variety of findings on all of these aspects of recovery from significant alcohol and other drug problems.
10:15 AM - 10:30 AM: Coffee Break
Morning Coffee Break
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM: Morning Panel Discussion
Theater
We have seen significant progress in the field of addiction and recovery research over recent years. The work is still largely underfunded and the need for adequate data and outcomes is greater than ever before. This session will bring together thought leaders in the field to discuss the past, present, and future of the field. Where do opportunities lie, where have we fallen short, and what is the path ahead?
11:30 AM - 1:00 PM: Lunch
Lunch (on your own, limited seating available for Ryan Leaf luncheon below)
11:30 AM - 1:00 PM: Luncheon with Ryan Leaf (Open to all)
Luncheon with Recovery Advocate and Former NFL QB Ryan Leaf (Open to all)--- Located in the Ballroom and Sponsored by Transcend Recovery
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM: Afternoon Keynote Presentation
Theater
It is increasingly recognized that genetic influences play a role in why some people are more likely to develop substance use problems, but what does that really mean, and why should you care?  In this presentation Dr. Dick will explain what is currently known about genetic influences on addiction, why they make some people more at risk than others, and what we can do with that information to help prevent problems and develop better interventions. 
2:00 PM - 2:15 PM: Coffee Break
Afternoon Coffee Break
2:15 PM - 3:15 PM: Closing Keynote Presentation
Theater
This presentation will provide an overview of Virtual Reality applications for substance misuse research and treatment. VR has been established as a novel method to study craving, and now offers the foundation to use VR environments to teach coping skills and relapse prevention strategies to improve cessation rates. The use of Google Cardboard and other portable VR solutions to bridge the gap between clinical and real world settings will be discussed.  Overall, VR is a cutting edge tool that can be used to augment traditional evidence-based interventions and enhance therapeutic gains.
6:00 PM - 6:45 PM: All Recovery Meeting
All Recovery Meeting in the Recovery Room
6:00 PM - 8:30 PM: ARHE/ARS Awards Ceremony and Gala
ARHE/ARS Awards Ceremony and Gala--- Located in the Ballroom. Purchase Tickets Online or Onsite. Award Winners listed in onsite program and on ARHE website.
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM: "H-Town Sober Getdown"
Student Hangout, Pizza Party, Bowling, Games, and Karaoke--- Located in the Student Center Game Room (Basement Level)
Tuesday, July 10th, 2018
6:30 AM - 7:30 AM: Morning Yoga at Campus Rec Center
Morning Yoga at Campus Rec Center--- Located at 4500 University Drive. About 5 minute walk from Student Center.
7:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Gratitude Lounge Open
Gratitude Lounge--- Located in the Skyline Room. Lounge Pass Required.
8:00 AM - 8:45 AM: All Recovery Meeting
All Recovery Meeting in the Recovery Room
8:00 AM - 8:00 PM: Recovery Room Open
Recovery Room--- Located in the Astrodome Room. Meeting Schedule can be found at registration desk, online, or in the room.
8:00 AM - 6:00 PM: Social Media Scavenger Hunt
Social Media Scavenger Hunt- connect with us on social media to see all the details!
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM: Registration Open
Registration Open--- Located Outside of the Conference Exhibit Hall (Houston Room). On the 2nd Floor of the UH Student Center.
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM: Exhibit Hall Open
Exhibit Hall--- Located in the Houston Room.
8:00 AM - 6:00 PM: Collegiate Recovery Showcase Room Open
Collegiate Recovery Showcase Room--- Located in the Ballroom
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM: Conference Breakfast
Conference Breakfast--- Located in the Exhibit Hall. Also served in the Collegiate Recovery Showcase Room.
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM: ARHE/ARS/APG Keynote
Theater
Alternative peer groups (APGs), recovery high schools (RHS), and collegiate recovery programs (CRPs) play a critical role in the continuum of care for young people in or seeking recovery from substance use disorders. The purpose of this session is to engage and educate the audience about the role of each of these resources. Audience members will hear directly from a student who has benefited from all three of these supports, and develop a greater understanding for youth recovery support services.
10:25 AM - 10:30 AM: Special Announcement from ARHE and SAFE Project US
Special Announcement from ARHE and SAFE Project US
10:30 AM - 10:45 AM: Coffee Break
Morning Coffee Break
10:45 AM - 11:45 AM: ARHE/ARS/APG Breakout Sessions
Session Title: No Family is Safe (F)
Space City Room
In September 2017, retired Navy Admiral and former Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff James Winnefeld and his wife longtime military family advocate Mary Winnefeld dropped off their 19-year old son, Jonathan, at college to begin his freshman year. They were hopeful but anxious because Jonathan had struggled with a lifetime of anxiety and depression that ultimately led to addiction. One year into his recovery, Jonathan was still vulnerable.

Three days later, the Winnefelds received the call every parent fears ? Jonathan was gone, the victim of an accidental opioid overdose. An all-American close-knit family, a father who commanded the U.S. military, but they couldn't save their son.

In November 2017, the Winnefelds established the national non-profit, S.A.F.E. Project US, attacking the addiction epidemic through six interdependent lines of operation. For more information, please visit safeproject.us.
Downtown Room
Treating co-occurring disorders is complex and difficult for clinicians. In the past, the field has attempted to treat co-occurring disorders separately, but evidence in recent years suggests that treating both disorders at the same time yields the best results. This presentation will offer an overview of the challenges and clinical issues that are present in helping people with dual diagnoses. Recommendations for assessment and treatment of co-occurring disorders will be provided, and a case example will be presented to assist with application of information
Bayou City Room
Industry thought leader William White writes about the promise of treatment models that, "blend traditional clinical interventions with broader recovery-focused community development and cultural revitalization strategies." This presentation explores innovative approaches that, together, help bridge the gap between campuses and treatment centers. Attendees will be introduced to The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation's new clinical collaboration models designed to share best practices among like-minded organizations and to extend care and support for patients, as well as The Haven at College's on-campus continuum of care that meets students where they are. Q&A and facilitated discussion will enrich and inspire the audience to discuss innovative, "out of the box" ideas that bridge the service and communication gaps between treatment centers and universities.
Heights Room
The journey of students in a Collegiate Recovery Program (CRP) often begins with early recovery and continues towards a well-developed mental, spiritual, emotional, and physical state. In traditional recovery programs, much emphasis is placed on mental, emotional, and spiritual healing. Though all of these aspects are vital to flourishing in recovery, nourishing the physical state is often overlooked. This presentation will provide information on a "missing link" within CRPs: the role of nutrition, which significantly impacts physical well-being in recovery and a student's reconnection with their body. Delivering information on the many aspects impacted from nutritional deficiencies and imbalances (neurobiological, gastrointestinal, emotional, mental), particularly in early recovery, will provide a means for attendees to evaluate their inclusion of nutritional and physical health emphasis at their CRP. Discussion will follow regarding appropriate implementation of resources to support this "missing link" in a student's journey to flourishing in recovery.
North Senate Chamber
Relapse rates have been reported as high as 60% within the first five years of Recovery. Doctors, pilots and other professionals have success rates as high as 93% at the same five-year mark. The Carolina Recovery Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill utilizes some of the same procedures and new technologies to aid students who are returning to the campus after completing treatment for a substance use disorder. This presentation discusses the efficacy and success of these supports and technologies with a college population. Specifically, how does mandating students to a myriad of Recovery Supports and services impact their Recovery and successful re-integration to the University.
Third Ward Room
This roundtable focuses on identifying and discussing current research trends associated with the field of Collegiate Recovery Programs (CRPs). Facilitators will discuss the effects of past research agendas, current patterns of investigation, and projected future works. The facilitators represent members of the CRP field who have extensively guided the development of our collective research pedigree. Participants should be prepared to engage with each other and the panel members in collaboratively discussing the impact that appropriate research agendas can have on the field of Collegiate Recovery. Participants will also have a chance to interact directly with the facilitators by asking questions. The overall goal of this roundtable is to provide participants an outline of past scholarship, describe current agendas, and discuss how to support a productive atmosphere of growth for the future.
Theater
Recovery High Schools enroll students from every neighborhood, all socioeconomic backgrounds, diverse ethnicities/cultures, a variety of family systems, and from all walks of life. Recovery High Schools are just as diverse and exist in different models, modalities, and systems. We are the collective experts. We are the village of knowledge, support, hope, best practices, strategy, and mentorship. We each have gifts to share and needs for growth or expansion. Get to know who is at the conference: who are you, what can we help you with, how can you serve?
Multipurpose Room
Building an Alternative Peer Group to treat adolescent and young adult substance use disorders and mental health issues in a new community requires very specific support from both the community and the staff who will be managing it. This presentation will offer an introduction to these challenges, a description of the support needed, and a discussion of the ways to avoid common pitfalls.
11:45 AM - 1:30 PM: Lunch
Lunch (on your own, limited box lunches available at Advocacy Luncheon below)
12:00 PM - 12:45 PM: All Recovery Meeting
All Recovery Meeting in the Recovery Room
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM: ARHE/ARS Advocacy Luncheon- Sponsored by Pavillon
Multipurpose Room
Advocacy has been a part of the development of collegiate recovery for the past thirty years. While most of the efforts to change systems and policies have been relegated to the individual institutions trying to create collegiate recovery programming, more is needed. There is a national recovery advocacy movement taking place at multiple levels. So far, collegiate recovery and recovery high school have played a small part in getting state and federal legislation passed, but we have yet to see a collective voice emerge from our ranks. Now is the time to empower our community to use its voice, share our students' stories and advocate for our campuses.
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM: ARHE/ARS/APG Breakout Sessions
Theater
Fifty percent of transgender young people will attempt suicide at least once before their twentieth birthday. Addiction amongst trans youth are not easily assessed, however amongst LGBTQ adolescents it is known that rates of addiction are significantly higher than that of their straight and cisgender peers. Minority stress, stigma, and bullying are leading causes for higher rates of addiction, anxiety, and depression. As clinicians, we need to create a space for understanding and safety within our walls of our facilities for these youths. This workshop will help clinicians grasp terms and situations that trans youth are experiencing today. Participants will be able to assess their practices and be able to take with them an overarching understanding of the coming out process. Discussions will include policy & paperwork, talking to parents, creating safety within the group process, and how to effectively be an ally to trans and non-binary youth.
North Senate Chamber
In 2015 West Virginia University established the first collegiate recovery program in West Virginia just three years later, four additional programs will receive funding from the WV Legislature as part of the state's Opioid Response Plan.
In addition to the $100,000 investment in collegiate recovery pilot programs, $500,000 for educational support for those in recovery via "Recovery Corps" is being designed collaboratively by the West Virginia Office of Drug Control Policy, Bureau for Behavioral Health and the Higher Education Policy Commission. "Recovery Corps" is similar to National Health Service Corps
Attend this session and learn more about engaging state governmental agencies and legislators to further the efforts for recovery support in your state.
Bayou City Room
CRPs are uniquely positioned to be valuable assets for universities to address substance-related issues in the collegiate environment. Utilizing the experience of students and staff members engaged in recovery support services empowers CRPs to implement alcohol and other drug (AOD) programming for the general student population. This presentation will outline how CRPs can implement education programs within their university in order to provide wider support and resources as well as challenge injunctive norms on campus. By employing various education initiatives, CRPs can reach a broader range of students while also attaining sustainability within the university structure.
Downtown Room
Collegiate recovery technical assistance has been offered by various organizations since 2007. With the refinement of the practice and the development of a technical assistance curriculum by Transforming Youth Recovery (TYR), emergent collegiate recovery communities and programs are beginning to utilize evidence-based practices to create, develop, and grow new programs on campuses across the country. This session will provide attendees with an exciting, interactive experience filled with discussion, debate, and new information about what is working in the technical assistance realm and what needs to be improved. The presenter will also discuss national trends in the field as well as review implications for the collegiate recovery field at-large.
Space City Room
During this session, the facilitator will engage in an open conversation with three college students who graduated from the Newport Academy Day School. These students will speak to their journey, their recovery high school path, and profound experiences that sustained them through that process. They will also share about what has bolstered their current journey through their universities and collegiate recovery experiences. The facilitator will discuss the various struggles each student experienced and the interventions that were put into place to help them redefine and achieve success in high school.
Third Ward Room
This roundtable provides attendees with the opportunity to discuss different models for campus-based recovery housing and explore best practices. The discussion will be opened among all attendees to share their experience with or ask questions about developing or managing recovery support housing within a college or university housing program. Topics will include: working with housing administration, stages of growth, application process, peer leadership, safety and wellbeing, working with recurrence of use, overcoming stigma, and community dynamics.
Heights Room
This session will guide you through the step by step accreditation standards for running the business side of Recovery High Schools. Learn from the best as you navigate selecting the model, identifying leadership, energizing a Board of Directors, building community partners and much more.
Multipurpose Room
Alternative Peer Group Programs have honed treatment strategies and tactics to increase the likely positive outcome in recovery from substance use and co-occurring disorders. This enthusiastic recovery model has been successfully treating adolescents and young adults who struggle with substance use and mental health disorders in Houston for 45 years.
2:30 PM - 2:45 PM: Coffee Break
Afternoon Coffee Break
2:45 PM - 3:45 PM: ARHE/ARS/APG Breakout Sessions
Theater
In 2013, Transforming Youth Recovery (TYR) published the "38 Assets for Building Collegiate Recovery Capacity" as a guide for its grant program, Seeds of Hope. Now, TYR is undertaking efforts to understand the diverse types of support services and resources that are being offered to students in recovery. In late 2017 and early 2018, TYR spent time conducting research to: (1) Validate the assumption that institutions of higher education are offering diverse types of prevention, treatment, and recovery support services and resources, (2) Offer an expanded definitional framework for school-based recovery support services in higher education to assist in the classification of resources for enhanced access by students and their families, and (3) Update census data on collegiate recovery services and resources in the U.S. The findings include responses from 118 unique institutions of higher education and provide the most comprehensive census the field has to date!
North Senate Chamber
Utilizing attachment-based emotionally focused family therapy, we will delineate a model designed to quickly educate parents and repair attachment wounds in adolescents and young adults.
Our approach accomplishes a greater depth of healing and strengthening in spite of a shorter 60-90 day treatment stay.
Through presentation and demonstration we will provide specific hands on micro skills to aid in healing. Participants will also have opportunity for skill building through role playing.
Bayou City Room
This presentation tells the story of BeVocal, a multi-issue bystander intervention initiative started at The University of Texas at Austin and expanded system-wide to all UT campuses. BeVocal and UT system bystander intervention initiatives promote the idea that individuals have the power to prevent high-risk behavior and harm. This is particularly relevant to the collegiate recovery community and in addressing high-risk behavior around alcohol and substance use on and around college campuses. This session will serve as a primer for a bystander intervention initiative and a rough blueprint for building or expanding one at your university, as well as aligning with an existing CRP.
Downtown Room
Collegiate Recovery Programs (CRPs) provide both social and instrumental support for individuals in recovery from substance use disorders or behavior process addictions who are pursuing post-secondary education. Career development and educational attainment are emphasized as prominent goals for individuals in collegiate recovery. Currently little research exists which examines factors that interfere with career development for this population. This study utilized a national sample (N = 82) of individuals involved in CRPs from 33 different institutions of higher education to investigate the impact of self-stigma on positive vocational outcome expectations. The results of this study indicate that increased self-stigma significantly predicted negative vocational outcome expectations for this sample. Suggestions are discussed for CRP program directors, college administration, and college counselors to address the unique needs of this student group.
Space City Room
With the continuous growth of the collegiate recovery movement, treatment providers are considering a return to school as a viable option for people in early recovery, and it is often the goal of the student to return to school as quickly as possible following treatment. The barriers to, and skills needed for, recovery maintenance and school completion are interconnected and should be addressed simultaneously in treatment with students planning to return to school. This presentation is designed to address the treatment provider's role in preparing a student to return to school by looking at ways to assess for barriers and resources and to build skills for both substance use recovery maintenance and the successful navigation of higher education.
Third Ward Room
Now, more than ever, many students' first contact with your program very well could be from your social media presence. This roundtable will explore helpful communicating tips and tools to bridge the intergenerational gap between staff and students that will help participants engage students and introduce their program to a broader audience.
Heights Room
Learn from RHS experts as you navigate the important factors surrounding diversity, parent engagement, transition planning, and structure for the school.
Multipurpose Room
Alternative Peer Groups provide a best-practice method of treating youth of suffer from substance use and mental health disorders that utilize positive peer influence to shape recovery norms. The research on Alternative Peer Groups is scant with only a few studies complete to date. This presentation will focus on the design and outcomes of these studies.
3:45 PM - 4:00 PM: Coffee Break
Afternoon Coffee Break
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM: ARHE/ARS/APG Keynote Sessions
Theater
Attendees will be provided with a brief history/timeline of collegiate recovery as a field, through the lens of research (with a focus on the explosive growth in knowledge in the last decade). This initial presentation will be followed by a synopsis of the current state of collegiate recovery science, focusing on recent studies in the field (CRP alumni survey; meta-reviews; and any large impact studies published in the last year, up to the month of the conference). The session will end with a presentation on the directions for the future, making clear calls that not only does the research need to continue and in what suggested ways, but also serving to inspire students to engage in the process as they are our best hope to continue the work in innovative ways we haven't thought of.
Multipurpose Room
Recovery High Schools work with a student population with high rates of suicide, co-occurring mental health issues, process addictions, overdoses and other high risk behaviors. Sadly, RHSs often experience the death of a current or former student. How that loss is processed is of vital importance to both the sanity of the faculty/students and the overall health of the entire community. Join us for a panel discussion about dealing with grief/loss and the huge responsibility we carry as school leaders to guide our communities through these difficult times.
6:00 PM - 6:45 PM: All Recovery Meeting
All Recovery Meeting in the Recovery Room
7:00 PM - 8:00 PM: Recovery Comedy Night with Mark Lundholm
Recovery Comedy Night with Mark Lundholm--- Located in the Theater and Sponsored by Burning Tree
8:00 PM - 10:00 PM: POP-AART Sober Party
POP-AART Sober Party--- Located in the Multipurpose Room. This event provides an opportunity for young people to create connections, friendship, fun and empowerment to support their recovery process. During the event opportunities will be available for the young people to share their insight and expertise to influence system changes within the adolescent substance use treatment and recovery service delivery system. You can learn more about AART-TX here: http://sites.utexas.edu/mental-health-institute/adolescent-substance-use-treatment-strategic-planning/
Wednesday, July 11th, 2018
6:30 AM - 7:30 AM: Morning Yoga at Campus Rec Center
Morning Yoga at Campus Rec Center--- Located at 4500 University Drive. About 5 minute walk from Student Center.
7:30 AM - 5:00 PM: Gratitude Lounge Open
Gratitude Lounge--- Located in the Skyline Room. Lounge Pass Required.
8:00 AM - 8:45 AM: All Recovery Meeting
All Recovery Meeting in the Recovery Room
8:00 AM - 8:00 PM: Recovery Room Open
Recovery Room--- Located in the Astrodome Room. Meeting Schedule can be found at registration desk, online, or in the room.
8:00 AM - 6:00 PM: Social Media Scavenger Hunt
Social Media Scavenger Hunt- connect with us on social media to see all the details!
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM: Registration Open
Registration Open--- Located Outside of the Conference Exhibit Hall (Houston Room). On the 2nd Floor of the UH Student Center.
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM: Exhibit Hall Open
Exhibit Hall--- Located in the Houston Room.
8:00 AM - 6:00 PM: Collegiate Recovery Showcase Room Open
Collegiate Recovery Showcase Room--- Located in the Ballroom
8:00 AM - 9:30 AM: Conference Breakfast
Conference Breakfast--- Located in the Exhibit Hall. Also served in the Collegiate Recovery Showcase Room.
8:15 AM - 9:15 AM: Community College Breakfast
Community College Breakfast--- Hosted by Transforming Youth Recovery. Located in the Collegiate Recovery Showcase Room.
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM: ARHE/ARS/APG Breakout Sessions
Theater
Attendees will be enriched by participating in this workshop as they learn to identify collegiate recovery community building and program development. Participants will identify multiple models of support, program administration, and data collection. This presentation will provide a comprehensive picture of collegiate recovery programming and the difference between programming and recovery support services. Participants will identify how to sustain and support recovery in higher education. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and gain insight.
Heights Room
There were over 700 overdoses and 180 deaths from opioids in Guilford County, NC in 2017. The Guilford Solution to the Opioid Problem (GSTOP) project leverages one-time funds allocated by the STOP-Act to design, implement, and evaluate a rapid response program intended to decrease mortality from opioid overdoses. The program engages citizens who overdose in harm reduction practices, distributes naloxone kits to high-risk users, conducts community health education, coordinates community resources through the CURE Triad collaborative, and builds relationships focused on ending opioid overdose. This presentation will review the development of the partnership between Guilford County Emergency Medical Services and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro that has resulted in the GSTOP demonstration project. The presentation will include background on the opioid epidemic in Guilford County, the development of CURE and GSTOP, the unique features of hosting such a program within a university, the evaluation design, and preliminary findings.
Bayou City Room
This presentation will focus on an inclusive intervention model, bridging the gap between current providers, families, treatment, and after-care. The model focuses on a team-based approach that is respectful and inclusive of the individual struggling with substance use disorder and other mental health concerns. This is done by exploring different non-coercive avenues to motivating the individual struggling, as well as supporting the family in their own process. Rather than judging the success of the intervention by the identified patients admission into treatment, this model's success focuses on outcomes such as follow through and completion of a continuum of care that is mutually agreed upon, and largely self-directed. We will also explore how this model fits for both resistant and non-resistant individuals and families as well as the importance of case management follow-up in supporting the long-term plan.
Third Ward Room
While the media continues to highlight the number of overdose deaths related to opioids, an estimated 2 million families are confronted with how to help support their loved on the path to recovery. This session will delve further into these challenges and address ways in which families can be empowered to be part of the solution and be an important tool in that recovery toolbox. Discussion will address peer supports, tools and strategies using Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) and other resources to help families recovery together.
Ballroom
This roundtable will serve as a follow-up session to the "Where Do We Come From, Where Are We Now, and Where Are We Going: Collegiate Recovery Science" keynote. During this roundtable, student researchers, or other early career researchers, will be invited to talk about their research, ask questions, and meet each other. The facilitators will be available to offer insight into previous research, answer questions about research designs, or any other topics student researchers wish to discuss.
Downtown Room
This presentation will consider how recovery high schools fit into the substance use & co-occurring disorder continuum of care. Presenters will receive final data from a comparative outcomes study evaluating the effectiveness of recovery high schools for improving behavioral & academic outcomes of adolescents after receiving treatment. Presenter will also explore the cost-benefit of recovery high schools to understand the net benefits of attending a recovery high schools for students and families.
Space City Room
Learn how to implement Restorative Practices into a recovery high school.
Multipurpose Room
Effective treatment of adolescents can only have lasting effects if the family recovers along with the adolescent, healing old wounds, bridging the barriers formed by years of dysfunction, and learning to trust. This presentation offers an overview of the major issues in family programs and strategies to address them.
10:30 AM - 10:45 AM: Coffee Break
Morning Coffee Break
10:45 AM - 11:45 AM: ARS/APG Breakouts
Bayou City Room
This presentation describes a variety of resources available to persons with substance use disorders who are seeking assistance in recovery. Included here are: Self-Management and Recovery Training; the 16 Steps for Discovery and Empowerment; Women for Sobriety; White Bison; 12 step groups; and other resources.
It is valuable to understand the similarities and differences between the various pathways of recovery. It can be helpful to offer options to those seeking help, as well as to answer questions if there is need for clarificaiton about these groups.
As there has been more sensitivity to the idea of a variety of pathways, there is also value in specifically discussing what these pathways may be.
Heights Room
Recovery High Schools are a unified education model of academics and recovery. Learn what the RHS accreditation standards can teach you about measuring student recovery, creating recovery culture/climate, and how to create a comprehensive recovery support program embedded into the every fabric of the school.
Space City Room
Opening and maintaining an APG can be the most rewarding endeavor a treatment person can ever do. However, there are pitfalls that can stymie the effort and cause unnecessary problems for the staff and clients. This panel is made up of seasoned professionals from management, implementation, and development. They bring 50 years of knowledge of some of these pitfalls and how to deal with them. This session will also provide an opportunity to address some high-level questions from the attendees and a springboard for creating the beginning notes for the planning breakout sessions to follow.
10:45 AM - 12:00 PM: ARHE Keynote
Theater
Social justice, diversity and inclusion have been the subject of two previous keynotes at the annual National Collegiate Recovery Conference. This year we are continuing the tradition of addressing this important topic, but will begin addressing different topics within this overarching theme. Gender equity in recovery settings is the first topic we will tackle.

Women represent just over 57% of the undergraduate college population in 2015, and are projected to climb to nearly 58.8% of the total college population by 2024 (National Center for Education Statistics, 2016). While not nearly as underrepresented as people of color in collegiate recovery programs (CRPs), women do make up a smaller share of CRP participants at 42.8% (Laudet, Harris, Kimball, Winters, & Moberg, 2014). While women are just as likely as men to become addicted to substances, they have lower rates of substance use and substance use disorders overall, and experience unique obstacles to treatment (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2016). Women of color may face additional obstacles and are at greater risk of being subjected to violence (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2016).

We invite men, women, and transfolk alike to join our feminist recovery panel as we delve into issues of equity and inclusion. While some have deemed feminism, "the other "F" word, we will talk about how feminism benefits everyone. We bring an intersectional lens - realizing that no one shows up or experiences life through one aspect of identity. Our panelists will share from research, personal experience, and program data in order to describe how current societal structures inhibit the opportunities for women to get sober and work a program of recovery and the negative impact on men, collegiate recovery programs, higher education, and society as a whole. Considering an individual, group, and institutional framework for feminism, we hope to inspire attendees to challenge themselves to bring a feminist lens to their work to better create equity and access within collegiate recovery.
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM: Lunch
Lunch (on your own)
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM: ARHE Member Town Hall Luncheon
ARHE Member Town Hall Luncheon--- Current ARHE Members Only. Located in the Multipurpose Room.
12:00 PM - 12:45 PM: All Recovery Meeting
All Recovery Meeting in the Recovery Room
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM: ARHE/ARS/APG Breakout Sessions
Heights Room
Modeled after SafeZone, RecoveryZone is an ally-training program developed at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro to help faculty, staff, and other students become more aware of issues facing students in recovery and to promote a more recovery-minded campus culture. This presentation first discusses the importance of ally-training programs for marginalized groups on college campuses and the need for reduction in stigma surrounding behavioral health disorders. We then describe the pilot implementation of eRecoveryZone, the online version of this training, which was launched in the 2016-2017 academic year. Participants who completed the online ally-training modules were given pre- and post-tests to determine whether completion of the eRecoveryZone program improved participants understanding of recovery in order to reduce stigma related to substance use disorders. Results indicate statistically significant reductions in various elements of stigma and increases in self-reported ally behavior with moderate to large effect sizes.
Bayou City Room
The process of grief, effects of loss, and the understanding of fears related to death can complicate both the onset and maintenance of recovery. This presentation addresses skills counselors need in order to effectively address issues associated with the grief process, the experience of loss, and the realities of death. This also applies to teachers and peer leaders. In addition, the presentation challenges participants to address their own grief issues in order to be better prepared to help others.
Downtown Room
Eating Disorder (ED) recovery is often difficult to define, which may leave those offering recovery support services feeling lost and discouraged when determining ED services in their CRP. Although CRPs primarily support Substance Use Disorders (SUD), research demonstrates 35% of people recovering from a SUD report also having an ED, thus making it imperative that CRPs understand and consider means for an ED supportive culture. Presenters will provide information on the state of ED recovery research and how to incorporate strategies for support, despite the size, tenure, or financial status of a CRP. Presenters will then provide their experience at the Texas Tech CRP and the evolution of ED support and culture within.
Third Ward Room
This roundtable will discuss the sharing of personal stories and inform participants on how they can do this in a recovery focused way. Students in recovery are often asked to share their stories with faculty, staff, and on media platforms. In these contexts it's important to know that the language used may either perpetuate or reduce stigma. This roundtable will teach participants on how they can share their stories while reducing stigma and focusing on recovery.
Space City Room
RHS are a unique balance of education and recovery. They are high functioning academic campuses that have special factors to consider. In this session you'll brainstorm academic curriculum, teacher professional development, special education services, and data driven instruction.
Theater
Alternative Peer Groups provide a best-practice method of treating youth of suffer from substance use and mental health disorders that utilize positive peer influence to shape recovery norms. Archway Academy has successful sustained their recovery school model by integrating with local Alternative Peer Groups to provide prosocial support before and after school.
2:15 PM - 4:15 PM: Afternoon Workout Hosted by The Phoenix
Afternoon Workout Hosted by The Phoenix--- Located at 4500 University Drive. About 5 minute walk from Student Center.
2:30 PM - 2:45 PM: Coffee Break
Afternoon Coffee Break
2:45 PM - 3:45 PM: ARHE/ARS/APG Breakout Sessions
Heights Room
Childhood experiences are powerful determinants of who we become as adults. Until fairly recently, trauma exposure was thought to be unilaterally rare (combat violence, disaster trauma). More recent research indicates that trauma exposure is actually common across all demographics. If 56% of a general population adult sample reported at least one adverse childhood event, shouldn't we do our best to assess our students and together create a plan of success? Stay tuned to learn more about Adverse Childhood Events (ACE) and become more adept at providing services that help students grow and thrive.
Theater
Many students in collegiate recovery programs benefit from advocacy and many more could benefit if systems of recovery support were better linked. For example, some might have a history that includes legal charges. Some students might desire an undergraduate or graduate degree leading to a career choice that involves a public safety-sensitive profession. Systems of support that help incent and sustain recovery from substance use disorders exist and are effective, but these systems generally function in isolation from each other, even when a student's recovery involves more than one of these systems.

Representatives from CRP, Drug Court, and Professional Monitoring will serve as Panel members, each providing an explanatory overview of their respective systems. Discussion will promote an accurate awareness of the purpose, philosophy, and practices of their systems; effective collaboration across these systems; and advocacy for strong continuity across these systems for optimal recovery support.
Multipurpose Room
The focus of this presentation surrounds emerging adult continuums of care for the 21st century, specifically collegiate recovery serving as an optimal extended care subacute support system. During the course of this presentation, we are seeking to teach attendees the three learning objectives below.
Bayou City Room
Laboratory drug testing has become a very vital component in the identification and monitoring of patients with Pain and Substance Use Disorders (SUD). The use of laboratory drug testing helps clinicians to develop accurate differential diagnostic problem lists at the outset of assessments for treatment planning. Ongoing laboratory drug testing enables the practitioner to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment plans initiated for the care of patients with a SUD.

The use of laboratory drug testing results provide, in many cases, a broad overview picture of the patient's recent, and in some case, past drug use history. The accuracy and reliability of the test results are the bedrock foundations of diagnosing, treating, and monitoring the efficacy of a treatment. Changes in laboratory drug test results during execution of the treatment plan can initiate changes in the treatment plan if results indicate new substance use evidence.
Downtown Room
The average age of first use of alcohol for teen boys is 11 and 13 for teen girls. The average age of first exposure to pornography is 9. More teens are suffering from depression than any other time in our history due to too much screen time. Cyberbullying peaks in the 6th grade. What is happening in our culture and to our children's neurodevelopment as a result of it? Engaging in high-risk behavior as a teen increases the chance of struggling with addiction as an adult by up to 90% due neurodevelopmental exposure and priming of the mesolimbic reward system. The Neuroscience of High-Risk Behavior elucidates how substances and other risky behavior, such as technology overuse, affect healthy neurodevelopment and how these effects impair adult functioning as well as implications for prevention and treatment. Practical, every-day parenting solutions and clinical techniques will be discussed so, bring your questions!
Space City Room
During this session, Dr. Avila will speak to the importance of understanding the social determinants of health, cultural and linguistic competency, and workforce diversity in promoting behavioral health equity for unserved and underserved racially/ethnically and other culturally diverse communities. The session will also highlight the importance of promoting diversity, equity, inclusion and justice in every aspect of service provision.
3:45 PM - 4:00 PM: Coffee Break
Afternoon Coffee Break
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM: ARHE/ARS/APG Breakout Sessions
Theater
Attendees will participate in an overview lecture on the first study of disordered eating subclinical behaviors among collegiate recovery students at Kennesaw State University. Data discussed will include predictive factors and the prevalence of disordered eating behaviors. Recommendations will include how CRPs can better support disordered eating recovery, information dissemination, and programmatic interventions.
Bayou City Room
College participation and substance use disorder treatment do not need to, nor should they, be pursued in isolation from one another. Modern treatment opportunities exist which place an emphasis on school as a restorative and curative aspect of the treatment plan, and encourage active class participation throughout the traditional treatment continuum. This interactive presentation will enhance participants' efficacy through reframing of clinical interventions in order to assist clients in finding their purpose through developmentally appropriate interventions, and the use of academics and "In-Vivo" offerings as an intervention to increase engagement in treatment. Adjusting our concept of a "continuum of care" to include real world experiences in order to challenge, empower, and inspire emerging adults; thereby creating a paradigm shift in the lives of recovering students in early stages of recovery.
Heights Room
Attendees will learn about the YES! For Schools program and research showing its impact on behaviors related to substance use disorder, such as impulsivity and depression. They will also learn about how the breathing techniques taught in the program increase brain capacity for self-regulation. Attendees will also receive a practical experience of some of the breathing techniques taught in the program that bring a calm state of mind.
Space City Room
This session addresses the near universal experience of grief and loss amongst individuals seeking treatment for SUDs, and the lack of common language, empirically supported models, and consistent treatment approaches.
Third Ward Room
This roundtable will engage participants in a conversation on how to intervene with a friend or family member who you feel is struggling with substance use. The facilitator will engage participants in positive motivation to change, non-confrontational language, compassionate strategies for influencing proper treatment and the role of the family system, human connection and environment in influencing treatment. Participants may engage role play for introduction to treatment.
6:00 PM - 6:45 PM: All Recovery Meeting
All Recovery Meeting in the Recovery Room
6:00 PM - 8:45 PM: Emerging Leaders in Recovery: Evening Reception and Forum (Open to all!)
Emerging Leaders in Recovery: Evening Reception and Forum--- Appetizers and Reception Located in the Multipurpose Room. Programming Starts at 7:00 P.M. and is Located in the Theater. Keynote Speaker: Matthew Russell. Panelists: Ariel Britt, Robert Hilliker, John Bock, and Kimber Falkinburg.
Thursday, July 12th, 2018
7:30 AM - 3:00 PM: Gratitude Lounge Open
Gratitude Lounge--- Located in the Skyline Room. Lounge Pass Required.
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM: Registration Open
Registration Open--- Located Outside of the Conference Exhibit Hall (Houston Room). On the 2nd Floor of the UH Student Center.
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM: Exhibit Hall Open
Exhibit Hall--- Located in the Houston Room.
8:00 AM - 9:30 AM: Conference Breakfast
Conference Breakfast--- Located in the Exhibit Hall
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM: The Yoga of 12-Step Recovery
Space City Room
This is a 90 minute 12-step meeting and recovery informed yoga practice. Attendees will have the opportunity to build community, foster their recovery, practice mindfulness, and create physical movement in their bodies.
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM: ARHE Breakout Sessions
Heights Room
Collegiate Recovery Programs (CRPs), rooted in slow-moving academic institutions, can be contrasted with relatively fast-moving private treatment entities, and this contrast has great potential for both conflict and mutual benefit. Conflict may arise from a misunderstanding about the role of CRPs in the continuum of care - frequently thought to be a referral source, when, in fact, they work best as a post-treatment resource, improving outcomes for students in recovery. Young adults are the fastest growing demographic seeking treatment for substance use disorders, and, because of this changing age profile, more treatment entities are seeking to serve young adults and coming into contact with CRPs. This presentation explores the nuances and ethical challenges facing those interactions and describes the benefits of collaboration when pursued thoughtfully. The experiences of a CRP and a sober living/IOP facility in Austin, Texas will also be presented as a framework for collaboration.
Bayou City Room
Recovery communities on college campuses can build recovery capital for students of color inside their recovery community. This session will present a new framework for the development of recovery capital for all of the related systems of a person in recovery: micro (self), mezzo, and macro to foster institutional recovery capital and incorporate this concept into the formation of CRPs/CRCs. This may help avoid the intersectional and institutional biases that exist for students of color (SOC) in recovery. Some suggestions for the challenges we have experienced in building our CRP at NCC will be addressed with developmentally-sound programming changes and outreach ideas appropriate to supporting recovery for SOC. These suggested changes can help create an environment which is CRP-driven, burgeoning with recovery capital that grows the CRP/CRC, and supports other people in recovery on campus or in the community. In turn, this partnership will help an institution grow their recovery capital.
Astrodome Room
The presenter has had the opportunity to take part in a variety of roles within a Collegiate Recovery Program, including student member, graduate intern, founding program manager and program director. Each of those roles has informed his current work as the Program Director at the University of Georgia. It is the belief of the presenter that we learn the most professionally from the mistakes we've made! The goal of this session is to pass along to the audience what he has learned in each role through the lens of the mistakes he has made! This presentation will be beneficial regardless of your current role in a CRP.
Downtown Room
POWER (Providing the Outside World with Empowerment and Resources), a student driven committee at Texas Tech's Collegiate Recovery Program, mission is to provide a foundation and a voice for underrepresented individuals in recovery by delivering positive end results through opportunities for success with a vision to instill hope for a promising future. Since 2015, staff and student peer leaders have conducted over 170 presentations reaching over 6000 people in an effort to help marginalized people pursue recovery and higher education.
This workshop will present not only the educational and recovery resources used in reaching out, but also the varying and tailored approaches and techniques utilized when conducting outreach work to specific marginalized populations. These materials and techniques have been honed through presentations and experience since 2015. During the workshop, student leaders, and members of POWER, will share their personal experiences of marginalization as well as their experience as presenters/peer leaders.
Third Ward Room
CRCs often struggle to retain the enthusiasm of students, the campus administration, and community partners after the first blush has faded. Facilitators will lead a conversation around activities for strengthening academic support, service, community engagement, and peer leadership development. As CRP/CRCs move from a mature to a sustainable entity they benefit greatly from mutual learning, thus, this workshop provides an opportunity for staff and students to create a widening vision that allows growth and visibility without jeopardizing core values of recovery support.
North Senate Chamber
Attendees will learn common challenges that students in recovery face from admission until graduation and how staff of collegiate recovery communities can respond through programming and partnerships. Some challenges that are experienced upon admission include acclimating to a new chapter of recovery on a college campus and learning the resources available. Upon graduation, some challenges include professional development, specifically how to navigate creating a resume with gaps of employment due to incarceration or treatment.
Multipurpose Room
Alternative Peer Group Programs have honed treatment strategies and tactics to increase the likely positive outcome in recovery from substance use and co-occurring disorders. This enthusiastic recovery model has been successfully treating adolescents and young adults who struggle with substance use and mental health disorders in Houston for 45 years.
10:30 AM - 10:45 AM: Coffee Break
Morning Coffee Break
10:45 AM - 11:45 AM: ARHE Breakout Sessions
Space City Room
This presentation will explore the important role families play in the recovery process for Latino students involved in Collegiate Recovery Programs. Attendees will learn how the presenter learned the importance of understanding the vital role culture plays in different recovery communities and how that affects students in or seeking recovery.
Bayou City Room
The findings from this study provide valuable insight into how students in recovery from Alcohol and/or other SUDs who participate in Collegiate Recovery Programs (CRPs) negotiate multiple and often competing identities within the complex discursive environments of campus life. Condensing nearly 50 hours of in-depth phenomenological interviews with 12 participants at CU Boulder, the University of Michigan, and Penn State, this study examines various ways in which students narrate themselves, what discourses are evident in their stories, the ways in which each student's various identities exist in tension with one another, and the individual and group strategies students employ that help them navigate tensions in their sociocultural environments, enabling them to find success across multiple domains. The understandings gained in this research inform the ongoing work happening in CRPs and the support structures in place to support them.
Downtown Room
In 2016, TYR could identify only six community colleges offering recovery support programs and services. Based on this finding, TYR identified a need for pilot programs to better understand programmatic models that may be effective for supporting students in recovery at community colleges. TYR's Bridging the Gap grant program supports these pilot programs and is intended to act as a catalyst for building capacity for recovery support on community college campuses across the U.S. The goal of the program is two-fold; first, to help more 2-year institutions initiate recovery support and second, to study what programs and services are viewed as helpful and useful so that best practices can be shared. This session provides attendees with a recap of TYR's 2016 research, observations from Year 1 of the grant program, and a rich discussion on survey responses on institutional attitudes and student engagement in recovery support on 2-year campuses.
Heights Room
This presentation is an examination of the pilot year of the Healthy Lifestyles Living Learning Community (HL LLC) substance-free housing option for incoming first year students sponsored by The Center for Students in Recovery at The University of Texas at Austin.

Presenters will contextualize the history and unfulfilled need for recovery and sober student housing on the UT Austin campus, and will explore the development and implementation of a sober dorm from inception through the end of year one.

Attendees will hear a candid assessment of expectations versus realities across multiple domains, including: the application process; selection of an initial cohort; the design and implementation of programming; the challenges of group cohesion and resident assistant empowerment; budget constraints; overall lessons learned; and considerations moving into year two.
Astrodome Room
Young adults increasingly enter college with substance use disorders. Some may achieve recovery before setting their foot on a college campus whereas others during their college years. These students often struggle to maintain recovery as they act out their daily lives because they find themselves in abstinence-hostile environments. This presentation will discuss students' collegiate recovery experiences and will report on a photovoice project documenting students' recovery experience and recovery management and support needs. Photovoice is a participatory social action method that uses photography to answer research questions; a photovoice exhibit, involving a gallery of participants' photographs and linked narrative text to explicate the photos' meaning, disseminates the findings. The presentation will focus on the narratives of students in recovery and attendees will obtain an in-depth understanding of recovering students' experiences of stigma, shame and isolation, and marginalized social positions, which are intimately tied to their substance use histories. Students in recovery represent an invisible student group that struggles to access resources and needed healthcare services. The photovoice method can act as a powerful tool to empower marginalized students to share their recovery experiences and articulate their needs; ultimately providing a vehicle for structural-level and systemic change.
North Senate Chamber
Learn how collegiate recovery programs work as a recovery ecosystem that supports students as they evolve over time. This session will present a unique comparative graphic timeline and discussion illustrating the trajectory and experiences of four different students at the University of Colorado, and the wide range of recovery support services they engaged with through their academic path according to different needs and different stages of recovery. Attendees will gain a tangible understanding of how collegiate recovery programs actually work and how they are able to serve and respond to student needs in very different scenarios. Follow along as these four students navigate the transition from high schools and treatment programs into successful college life. Learn how they are able to establish stable recovery over time through a dynamic and individualized continuum of support provided by their collegiate recovery program and peers in recovery.
Multipurpose Room
Building an Alternative Peer Group to treat adolescent and young adult substance use disorders and mental health issues in a new community requires very specific support from both the community and the staff who will be managing it. This presentation will offer an introduction to these challenges, a description of the support needed, and a discussion of the ways to avoid common pitfalls.
11:45 AM - 1:15 PM: Lunch
Lunch (on your own)
1:15 PM - 2:15 PM: ARHE Breakout Sessions
Space City Room
Capacitype data and mapping services help groups and organizations build capacity for recovery in their communities. The idea behind Capacitype is to invite everyone to map assets - those people, places, and services that people are finding helpful on pathways to recovery. Since 2013, members of TYR's grantee network have been using Capacitype to find and make visible the resources in their community that are supportive of students in recovery. This action of finding, mapping, and building relationships has helped over 160 programs throughout their lifecycles. This session will provide attendees with an overview of the capacity building methodology, an orientation to the Community Asset Mapping Toolkit, and hands-on experience using online tools from Capacitype. Included will be a presentation on emerging insights from efforts being made to create a classification and access system for resources specific to prevention, early intervention, treatment, and recovery support in the U.S..
North Senate Chamber
This workshop reviews the science, theory, and importance of utilizing a continuum of care in substance use disorder treatment for emerging adults. Residential treatment modalities often only include 28 days of concurrent treatment. Interestingly, this model in isolation is not supported by theory, or emerging data for the emerging adult population. Implications from developmental theory, prefrontal cortex maturation, and direct science associated with programmatic tiers, social support, and structured lifestyle will be discussed. The importance of continuum of care services will also be discussed, including transitional living, intensive outpatient treatment, individual counseling, and collegiate recovery programs (CRPs).
Downtown Room
This presentation shares the process and findings of a funded interdisciplinary project involving researchers engaging in the difficult integrative dialogues to incorporate findings from diverse areas of research and practice. This interdisciplinary project, part of the Pop-Up Institute initiative at UT Austin, brought together researchers, community partners, peers, and students for one year to foster the kind of collaborative deconstruction of silos that is essential to the progression of the addiction recovery field. Results, lessons learned, and future directions gleaned from the Pop-Up Institute's year of activities will be discussed during this presentation.
Heights Room
Technology has created the means to accelerate and guide the necessary social/peer elements of recovery. Nowhere is this platform more appropriate than in the educational and peer group environments. These advances are revolutionary and will transform outcomes in the treatment field, however, the technology is advancing so fast that the field is already behind in understanding and adapting these tools to the recovery processes. Attendees will have the opportunity to work hands on with some of these recent tech tools, get a sense of their application and the outcomes, and think ahead as to how they can utilize them in their own practice.
Astrodome Room
This presentation describes the different processes and steps taken by a few faculty members from the social work department and a group of students to start a Center for Students in Recovery (CSR) at a small private university in central Texas serving mostly first-generation Hispanic students. Emphasis will be given to the role of student leadership, CSR stages, parties involved, successes and lessons learned.
Bayou City Room
The prevalence of substance use disorders continues to rise with a significant impact on
families, communities, and the healthcare system. The current opioid crisis suggests a need to re-assess entrenched treatment protocols for addictive disorders. Classically, treatment includes mental health services such as psychopharmacology and individual and group therapy sessions. There is little data about the role of physiological
recovery particularly nutrition during early recovery. It is well known that substance use disorders are associated with neglected health including nutritional deficiencies. There is recent evidence linking the gut and brain, suggesting that proper dietary intake is critical for mental health. Substance use disorder treatment protocols may benefit from including nutrition services as a treatment modality.
Third Ward Room
Facilitators will discuss experiences collaborating with college offices, departments, and programs who may not always realize how missions overlap. Also to be explored: the value of outreach presentations to faculty and staff, as well as developing internships for students in different colleges.
Multipurpose Room
Opening and maintaining an APG can be the most rewarding endeavor a treatment person can ever do. However, there are pitfalls that can stymie the effort and cause unnecessary problems for the staff and clients. This panel is made up of seasoned professionals from management, implementation, and development. They bring 50 years of knowledge of some of these pitfalls and how to deal with them. This session will also provide an opportunity to address some high-level questions from the attendees and a springboard for creating the beginning notes for the planning breakout sessions to follow.
2:15 PM - 2:30 PM: Break
Break
2:30 PM - 3:30 PM: ARHE Keynote
Multipurpose Room
Panelists will discuss their unique experiences with staffing transitions and coming on board after a staff vacancy. "Many CRPs operate with a limited staff and budget" (A. Laudet, et al., 2013) which leads to more difficulty in maintaining services when there is a vacancy or staffing change. Additionally, there are "significant differences in level of organization and structure, and on the breadth of key services" (A. Laudet, et al., 2015) among CRPs leading to a lack of standard operating procedures that can be widely applied. This discussion will examine strategies to reduce the loss of institutional knowledge during transitions, and insure continuity of services with consideration for the diversity of each CRP.