NSDTA with APHSA

October 15 - 18, 2016
Hyatt Regency | New Jersey Professional Center at DCF
Cultivating Excellence. Growing Innovation. Harvesting Results.

Friday, October 14th, 2016
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM: Breakfast
Title: Breakfast
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
 
 
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM: EAC Meeting
Title: Executive Advisory Committee Meeting
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
 
 
10:00 AM - 10:30 AM: Break
Title: Break
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
 
 
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM: Lunch
Title: Lunch
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
 
 
Saturday, October 15th, 2016
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM: Breakfast
Title: Breakfast
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
 
 
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM: EAC Meeting
Title: Executive Advisory Committee Meeting
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
 
 
10:00 AM - 10:30 AM: Break
Title: Break
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
 
 
11:00 AM - 5:00 PM: Registration
Title: Registration
Garden State Prefunction, 1st Floor
 
 
 
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM: Seminar
Title:  Essential Training for New Trainers
Garden State A, 1st Floor
 
 Essential Training for New Trainers is for new trainers wanting to build their classroom techniques and skills in presentation, transfer of learning, technical aides, and practical aides on any subject matter. This workshop is geared for the New Trainers. Experienced trainers, knowledgeable in the areas of Transfer of Learning and Adult Learning Theory may get a few tips or reminders, but certainly would already know much of what is being presented, albeit it in possibly a new way. Comments from previous participants in this workshop include the following: > Made me see how different technique change the atmosphere > I will be able to apply something from this workshop to my job or my agency/organization. >Will be using it in my training > Interacting, and the visual parts added. >The presenter was very knowledgeable. > The activities to engage the learners >Having trainees/attendees participate - games, etc.interactivity with other people > This workshop was very effective and efficient. Enjoyed it! > The information that was shared was immediately applicable to the upcoming trainings I will be facilitating > It was an amazing workshop that I feel ALL new trainers should take.
 
Presenters
Paul Needham, Mr, TCS Services
 
Title: Identifying the "Value" of Engagement throughout the Delivery of Training and Organizational Effectiveness Work Sessions
Garden State B, 1st Floor
 
Participant engagement is a critical and valuable component throughout the development and delivery of training and organizational effectiveness (OE) work sessions. During this workshop, participants will be introduced to APHSA's Health and Human Services Value Curve. The Value Curve is a lens, or a way of looking at what we do from the point of view of our consumers (participants). This workshop will provide participants with an overview of the four progressive levels of the Value Curve and how each level can lead to a successful design, development and delivery of training and OE work sessions. Outagamie County's Department of Health and Human Services (Wisconsin) will share their work implementing the Value Curve within their agency through a partnership with APHSA and Casey Family Programs.
 
Presenters
Jennifer Kerr, OE Consultant, American Public Human Services Association
Monica Uitenbroek, CPS Caseworker / OE Facilitator, Outagamie County Department of Health and Human Services
Kathryn Krauter, Outagamie County Department of Health and Human Services
 
Title: Secrets to an Amazing Curriculum
Garden State C, 1st Floor
 
Great training starts with amazing curriculum that teaches important concepts while fully engaging learners. Amazing curriculum starts with competencies that reflect designated levels of learning and then fully develops content to contain complete instructions to the trainer as well as the content to be trained. The "amazing" happens when the learning points manifest in engaging and meaningful activities that fully facilitate participant learning and integration. But how does one get to amazing curriculum? Here's the secret?it's really NOT a secret and this workshop will tell-all about how to write your own amazing curriculum. If you've ever been given the assignment to write curriculum, but have no idea on where to start, then this workshop is for you. Learn how to develop competencies, craft creative activities that target your learning points, and write fully developed curriculum in a step-by-step process. This workshop merges the creative aspect of curriculum development with the linear process necessary to achieve truly amazing curriculum.
 
Presenters
Charmaine Brittain
Brenda Lockwood
 
2:15 PM - 2:45 PM: Break
Title: Break
Garden State Prefunction, 1st Floor
 
 
 
4:00 PM - 4:45 PM: Invitation Only Session
Title: NSDTA Scholarship Winners and Executive Advisory Council Reception (by invite only)
Conference I, 2nd Floor
 
The NSDTA Executive Advisory Council will welcome the 2016 Joan Carrera Scholarship winners to the conference at this by invitation only reception.
 
Presenters
 
4:45 PM - 7:00 PM: President's Reception
Title: Opening / President's Reception
Brunswick Ballroom, Lower Level
 
Join your peers to kickoff the NSDTA conference.
 
Presenters
 
Sunday, October 16th, 2016
7:30 AM - 8:30 AM: Breakfast
Title: Breakfast
Regency Foyer, 1st Floor
 
 
 
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM: Registration
Title: Registration
Garden State Prefunction, 1st Floor
 
 
 
9:00 AM - 9:45 AM: Welcome Open General Session
Title: Welcome Opening General Session
Brunswick Ballroom, Lower Level
 
 
 
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM: Going Up? Elevating Your Training to a New Level
Title: Going up? Elevate your training to a new level!
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
Are you looking to innovate in the way you teach technology? Don't throw out what works, just add some new tools to your training tool bag. Use a new dynamic and versatile medium. Upgrade your visual content. Add animated videos, e-learning modules and quick clips to your instructor led training. Engage and provide fun alternatives to text content, not impeded by traditional constraints surrounding live-action video. Give your static info-graphics an upgrade. Provide your users with a "guided tour" through training content utilizing promising practice. Through trainer-learner interaction, this workshop will model state-of-the-art training approaches and techniques and will incorporate adult learning approaches and interactive skill building techniques. Use of innovative products and how to best use those in a new five step approach include: 1. MARKET new technology: Use the power of the animated video 2. Provide FUNCTIONAL Computer Based Training: Create e-learning modules that show users how the new technology works 3. Employ PROCESS Computer Based Training: Develop quick clips that show users how to do their specific job tasks in the new technology and address policy changes 4. LEVERAGE technology training tools: Imbed them into Instructor Led Training 5. BRING TRAINING TO USERS: In a Mobile Tablet PC Classroom, present a highly engaging guided tour through content
 
Presenters
Paula Boyd, LCSW, Children Services Administrator II, Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services Business Information Systems
 
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM: Climbing the Mountain One Day at a Time: Texas's Journey to Revamping Caseworker Training
Title: Climbing the Mountain One Day At A Time: Texas's Journey to Revamping Caseworker Training
Regency B, 1st Floor
 
Child welfare in Texas struggled has struggled with how to train new caseworkers for quite some time. Numerous reports indicated that training was missing the mark. As a result, Texas embarked on a journey to revamp training using the experiences and expertise of direct delivery staff to guide the way. This workshop will provide an overview of the excursion including the sharing of tools developed to transform new caseworker training from a classroom centered approach to a field driven approach to learning.
 
Presenters
Tanya Rollins, CPS Disproportionality Manager, Texas Department of Family and Protective Services
 
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM: Willie Wonka and the Human Services Value Curve: A Golden Ticket to Cultivating Professional & Organizational Development
Title: Willie Wonka and the Human Service Value Curve: A Golden Ticket to Cultivating Professional & Organizational Development
Regency C, 1st Floor
 
Using the movie adaptation of the famous Roald Dahl story as a metaphor, workshop participants will explore what the HSVC is and how it could be used to support organizational development as well as individual learning. At its core, "Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" is essentially a story about succession planning - a key OD/OE consideration. The HSVC emerged from Harvard Kennedy School's Leadership for a Networked World, an applied research initiative of Antonio M. Oftelie being studied and implemented in numerous jurisdictions nationally. In this workshop, practical applications of the HSVC for understanding and shifting organizational culture, designing avenues for professional growth and strategic planning will be discovered. Participants will leave with action plans for using the HSVC - not in a "world of pure imagination", but in the real world of their agencies and professional communities.
 
Presenters
Stacey Hardy-Chandler, Director of Professional & Organizational Development, Fairfax County Department of Family Services
 
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM: Cultivating a Facilitator's Agenda at Harvests Results
Title: Cultivating a Facilitator's Agenda that Harvests Results
Garden State A, 1st Floor
 
A facilitator's agenda is an Organizational Effectiveness tool unique to the needs of the facilitator(s) and session participants which provides guidance to ensure the goals and objectives of the session are met. This workshop will provide participants with the skills to build a facilitator's agenda, incorporating tools and resources to run a successful meeting or facilitation session.
 
Presenters
Kathleen Swain, Supervisor, Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center
Jennifer Kerr, Organizational Effectiveness Consultant, American Public Human Services Association
 
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM: Accommodations & Accessibility 101: Respect and Inclusion for All Learners
Title: Accommodation and Accessibility 101 Respect and Inclusion for All Learners
Garden State B, 1st Floor
 
In this session we will discuss what the American's With Disabilities Act says about training accommodation and accessibility. We will review the benefits of universal design and what appropriate accommodation for learners with various disabilities looks like from the perspectives of training development, classroom set-up, and training delivery. Well-meaning people may do more harm than good when trying to assist an individual with a disability. How to communicate respectfully with learners with disabilities, as well as appropriate ways to assist them will be discussed. Some may have concerns about providing feedback on a new employee trainee to a supervisor. We will clarify the facilitator's responsibility and practice appropriately documenting observed behaviors. Implementation of this knowledge added to our awareness of engaging adult learners will create an environment conducive to learning for individuals of all abilities.
 
Presenters
Tami Long, Director of Rehabilitation, Tennessee Department of Human Services
Daniel Ferguson, Director of Support Divisions Training, Tennessee Department of Human Services
 
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM: Setting Foundation for Continuous Quality Improvement: A Multifaceted Approach to Curriculum Evaluation
Title: Setting the foundation for continuous quality improvement: A multifaceted approach to curriculum evaluation
Garden State C, 1st Floor
 
The Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center (CWRC) at the University of Pittsburgh provides training for child welfare staff across the Commonwealth. One of CWRC's goals is to produce high-quality curricula, delivered by well-prepared trainers, so that participants gain critical knowledge and skills which they can incorporate into their everyday work. Over the past several years, CWRC has developed multiple tools and processes to assess the extent to which we are achieving this goal and to support our continuous quality improvement efforts. These tools and processes serve many purposes, including informing curriculum revisions, identifying professional development strengths and opportunities for trainers, and assessing the effectiveness of training. They include a trainer observation tool, participant and trainer feedback forms, pre- and post-tests, and embedded evaluations. This presentation will describe our sometimes bumpy and circuitous journey to develop these tools and processes including our lessons learned and the road ahead.
 
Presenters
P.J. Lundgren, Program Development Specialist, University of Pittsburgh, School of Social Work, The Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center
Sharon England, Curriculum and Trainer Development Department Manager, University of Pittsburgh, School of Social Work, The Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center
Marlo Perry, Research Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work, Child Welfare Education and Research Programs
 
11:30 AM - 1:00 PM: Awards Luncheon
Title: Awards Luncheon
Brunswick Ballroom, Lower Level
 
 
 
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM: Is Training a "Leader of Doer" in Managing Knowledge for Impact?
Title: Is Training a "Leader or Doer" in Managing Knowledge for Impact?
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
The human services workforce is suffering from infobesity! Staff are overwhelmed by the amount of information coming at them on a daily basis - including in training. The reason?managing and sharing knowledge in organizations is a highly complex endeavor. Training is often at the forefront of knowledge dissemination and has a unique opportunity to lead cultures of learning where methods for translating knowledge to practice are "right sized and packaged" in ways that promote staffs' fuller understanding of issues and ability to make better decisions. Join this conversation and explore the dynamics of infobesity, effective knowledge management, and mobilization so that you can lead your organization in managing knowledge for impact!
 
Presenters
Christine Tappan, Director of Strategic Managment, APHSA
 
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM: Harvesting Staff Talent Through Superior Coaching
Title: Harvesting Staff Talent through Supervisor Coaching
Regency B, 1st Floor
 
The Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center recognizes the critical role that supervisors have in ensuring that their employees perform at their highest ability. As a result, a supervisor coaching series has been developed to equip supervisors with various techniques to use when working with their staff. This session will focus on the coaching methods used, the impact of adult learning style on the process of coaching and how this information can enhance employee performance. In addition, presenters will share specific examples of how this has been used within an organization that determined its supervisors held the key to improving agency practice.
 
Presenters
Christina Fatzinger, Practice Improvement Specialist, Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center
Russ Cripps, Practice Improvement Specialist, Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center
Dave Mattern, Director of Continuous Quality Improvement and Professional Services, York County Office of Children, Youth, and Families
 
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM: Supporting Direct Service Providers: Philadelphia's Guide to Continuous Quality Improvement Throughout Practice
Title: Supporting Direct Service Providers: Philadelphia's Guide to Continuous Quality Improvement Throughout Practice
Regency C, 1st Floor
 
In this workshop, we will be examining Philadelphia's Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) efforts. The Improving Outcomes for Children (IOC) Initiative is a community neighborhood approach to child welfare service delivery. This presentation will review the guiding principles of IOC, its goals and its emphasis on community support.
 
Presenters
Robin Chapolini
Lisa Mahoney
 
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM: Beyond Competent Workforce: Professional Pathways for Supporting Employee Professional Development
Title: Beyond Competent Workforce: Professional Pathways for Supporting Employee Professional Development
Garden State A, 1st Floor
 
Association for Talent Development 2008 study found that "employees who understand that they have options to learn and grow within an organization have reasons to invest themselves in their work and feel deeper connections to their employer" (Vickers et al.). Supporting staff to become competent in the skills and knowledge to be successful in their current job is not enough; to attract and retain a high quality, diverse workforce we need to shift our thinking to focus on how we support staff professional development and growth. Growth and an urgent need to bring more diversity to its workforce led Seneca to think critically about strategies to develop and retain its own social workers. Seneca had to think creatively about how to support staff through a thoughtful professional development path, beginning with a clearly articulated "Path to Clinical Excellence." The path begins with providing writing courses, includes university partnerships to provide embedded Masters degree programs, provides funding as well as supervision towards clinical licensure and then continual education and leadership opportunities. Seneca has made a significant investment in the development and retention of Social Workers with the end goal of ensuring Seneca's services and supports for children and families will be even better and there will be a more competent and diverse social worker workforce to address the future needs of our communities. This workshop will discuss Seneca's "Path to Clinical Excellence," as a model for intentional staff development, and facilitate discussions regarding potential university and agency partnership opportunities to strengthen the professional development path for our field. Resource: Mark Vickers, & Holly B. Tompson, & Carol L. Morrison, & Donna J. Bear, & Andrew Paradise, & Mike Czarnowsky, & Tora Estep (2008). Learning's Role in Employee Engagement. American Society of Talent Development.
 
Presenters
Megan McQuaid, Director, Seneca Institute for Advanced Practice, Seneca Family of Agencies
Jennifer Blanza, Assistant Training Director, Seneca Family of Agencies
 
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM: The Millennials Are Here! Now What?
Title: The Millennials are Here! Now What?
Garden State B, 1st Floor
 
Millennials in the workplace are changing the way organizations look at work and productivity. Independent young workers push leaders to re-evaluate systems and practices that may presently be considered standard. The workplace grapples and compete with a burgeoning social media presence and hand held devices that influence socialization and people skills, creativity, time management, and critical analysis skills. Resource management goals have to be re-imagined as Millennials approach the workplace in ways different from their predecessors; X'ers and Baby Boomers. This workshop focuses on organizational development and 3 principles of leading Millennials in the 21st century.
 
Presenters
Eugenia Turner, Training & Development Specialist, County of San Bernardino
 
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM: Incorporating Trauma Informed Services Into Violence Prevention Training
Title: Incorporating Trauma Informed Services into Violence Prevention Training
Garden State C, 1st Floor
 
People associate trauma with events such as terrorist attacks, natural disasters or mass shootings. Even though these events are traumatic and horrific on both a personal and national scale, the impact of other, more personal forms of trauma can transform communities and travel along the collective memory of generations. Experiences of a traumatic nature can affect behavior and, in turn, cause issues in relationships, especially within the workplace. While individuals experiencing trauma are working toward recovery and developing a long-term trauma response, the altered contexts in which they operate their everyday lives must be taken into account to facilitate overall resilience. Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) is an understanding that behavioral issues displayed by individuals are not necessarily a result of what is wrong with them, but rather reflect what has happened during their lives. TIC is redefining how to interact with disruptive behaviors by creating environments of safety, connection and management. TIC is an attempt to address trauma with a knowledgeable caution concerning past experiences, understanding that what might be considered unimportant to one person is a trigger for post-traumatic stress in another. Creating an environment in which traumatized individuals can operate in a safe and comfortable capacity will aid in their recovery. This session will dive deeper into aspects of trauma informed care and the specific benefits of using this approach when faced with a potential violent situation in the workplace. Learn concrete and practical advice for implementing trauma-informed crisis intervention program through real-life experiences and lessons learned.
 
Presenters
Raquelle Solon, Business Solutions Engineer, FEI Behavioral Health
 
2:30 PM - 3:00 PM: Break
Title: Break
Regency Foyer, 1st Floor
 
 
 
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM: Tackling Troublesome Trainees
Title: Tackling Troublesome Trainees
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
This interactive course will focus on anticipating and managing distracting behaviors and difficult participants in the classroom. Adult learning theory will be used to explain the right formula for creating a training environment that will keep learners engaged and minimize problematic behavior. Participants will discuss strategies for managing troublesome situations when they arise.
 
Presenters
Diana Cottrill, Learning Programs & Staff Development Coordinator, Fairfax County Department of Family Services
Mena Nakhla
 
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM: Simulations Through Collaboration: Caseworker Safety and Responsiveness in Child Welfare Practice
Title: Simulation through Collaboration: Caseworker Safety and Responsiveness in Child Welfare Practice
Regency C, 1st Floor
 
An increase in reports regarding dangerous or threatening field experiences underscored the need for rapid and effective learning solutions to support those front-line child welfare professionals charged with knocking on doors and facing the unknown. Through collaboration and inventive strategies, the PA Child Welfare Resource Center, the PA Children and Youth Administrators (PCYA), and County Child and Youth agencies combined their resources with a private provider, Service Access and Management, Inc. (SAM, Inc.) Together these entities deliver a caseworker safety learning solution throughout the state that includes simulation training, technical assistance, and transfer of learning opportunities for front-line child welfare professionals. Through an authentic simulation experience, this course challenges the participants to identify safety risks to themselves and others by employing child welfare practice model skills, including engagement and cultural awareness. This innovative plan includes interaction with professional role players and realistic settings presenting hazardous situations. Simulation labs aren't always available, therefore the plan utilizes county resources and actual apartment/hotel settings with essential props. Critical feedback and debriefing is provided by law enforcement professionals regarding the recognition and appropriate response to these hazardous conditions. In addition, child welfare supervisors, who also receive training credit, perform their critical role of analyzing and providing feedback regarding the use of child welfare practice model skills, for which they receive training credit. This workshop will outline the process by which partners engaged and collaborated in the creation of the simulation training. Tools and resources, including simulation templates, will be shared and demonstrated.
 
Presenters
Elizabeth Neail, Curriculum Supervisor, University of Pittsburgh, School of Social Work, Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center
Ronald Frederick, Personal Safety Director, Service Access and Management
 
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM: Ethical Issues in Culture & Diversity in Child Welfare Practice
Title: Ethical Issues in Culture and Diversity in Child Welfare Practice
Garden State A, 1st Floor
 
This workshop explores the relationship between our personal values and culture as this relates to best practice in culture; diversity and the ethics of social work practice. The class explores ethical issues faced by child welfare workers and how culture and diversity plays a big role in the decisions made in casework practice. Participants will discuss how bias, past experiences, and our own baggage creates an inability or barriers to making decisions that are ethical, consistent, and fair. Instructor will assist caseworkers in understanding their own culture and how this has affected their decisions on the job and how to breakdown previous barriers to be ethically correct in how they do their day -to-day professions.
 
Presenters
Dr. Christine Kelly-Cross, Senior Training officer, CCDCFS
Edwin Lebron, Senior Training Officer, Ohio Child Welfare Training Program
 
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM: Goldilock's Dillema: Too Hard? Too Easy? Or Just Right? Developing Pre-Post Questions to Evaluate Training
Title: Goldilocks's Dilemma: Too Hard?.Too Easy?.Or Just Right? Developing Pre/Post Questions to Evaluate Training
Garden State B, 1st Floor
 
This workshop offers an overview of lessons learned in evaluating more than 1,500 training classes annually through the use of pre/posttests aimed at measuring knowledge change for approximately 6,000 child welfare professionals by the New Jersey Child Welfare Training Partnership (NJCWTP). The presentation will discuss the development of test questions through collaborative efforts between subject matter experts and training evaluation team. The process explored will include: - Training course writers in developing effective test questions; - Use of a template to guide question development; - Formulating test questions aligned with curriculum learning objectives; - Determining question format based on best practices; - Evaluating test performance and making revisions in a fast paced training environment.
 
Presenters
Christine Allegra, Research Analyst, Rutgers University School of Social Work Institute for Families
Theresa McCutcheon, Director, Rutgers University School of Social Work Institute for Families
 
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM: Keynote & Reception
Title: Keynote: Understanding Toxic Stress and Wellness in the People You Train and Reception
Brunswick Ballroom, Lower Level
 
 
Presenters
Eric Arauz MLER
 
Monday, October 17th, 2016
7:30 AM - 8:30 AM: Breakfast
Title: Breakfast
Regency Foyer, 1st Floor
 
 
 
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM: Registration
Title: Registration
Garden State Prefunction, 1st Floor
 
 
 
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM: Strategies for Engaging Staff in Time of Change
Title: Strategies for Engaging Staff During Times of Change
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
The current state of human services, including the social climate, changing economy, and advances in technology, has created significant transformation within local agencies and organizations. In order to keep up with the changing times, it is vital for human service agencies to continually assess existing business processes. Projects that redesign strategies, systems, and methodologies can make provided services more effective and efficient. However, according to most research, many change projects do not meet their goals. For example in the Making Change Work Study facilitated by IBM in 2008, nearly 60% of projects fail to fully meet their objectives. The study showed that the most significant challenge when implementing change projects were people-oriented. In fact, the top two obstacles relate to the human side of change management?changing mindsets and attitudes and corporate culture. This workshop will focus on the management and leadership skills required to effectively manage the human side of change management. There are many different models, theories, and concepts of change management. Each approach has various advantages and disadvantages. In reality, most approaches to change management are dependent on the specific circumstances of a particular organization. However, this interactive session will provide a toolkit of best practices and techniques that are adaptable to all types of agencies and organizations that are experiencing any kind of change.
 
Presenters
Alexander Figueroa, Associate Program Manager, New Jersey Child Support Institute-Institute for Families- School of Social Work- Rutgers University
Eileen Kelly-O'Brien
 
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM: Coaching to Support Transfer of Learning
Title: Coaching to Support Transfer of Learning
Regency B, 1st Floor
 
The purpose of this workshop is to promote the use of coaching within the context of staff development, training and supervision, to improve transfer of learning. Training managers and supervisors wear many hats. Not only do they assist staff in decision making, time, and workload management, they are also responsible for helping staff improve skills and become competent workers. This session will describe the important role that coaching plays in transferring learning from the classroom to the workroom. The session is designed to introduce strategies that will help guide the development of skills. Throughout the session, the facilitator will demonstrate different coaching conversation strategies to engage staff in inquiry and identification of areas of strength and need related to their work and to lead to the creation of staff development plans.
 
Presenters
Brenda Lockwood, Senior Program Associate, University of Denver, Graduate School of Social Work, Butler Institute for Families
Lara Bruce, Program Associate, University of Denver, Graduate School of Social Work, Butler Institute for Families
Judy Gundy, Family Services Training Manager, Virginia Department of Social Services
 
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM: On The Road Again - Mapping the Way to a Successful Mobile Workforce
Title: On the Road Again - Mapping the Way to a Successful Mobile Workforce
Regency C, 1st Floor
 
Do you travel from place to place during your workday? Are staff based at different locations? Remote employment and similar alternatives to the traditional office-based workforce are growing trends among organizations. Join this interactive workshop to take a closer look at the research and tools supporting mobile work and to determine if they are a good fit for your organization. Hear the successes and lessons learned from two Pennsylvania organizations currently managing a mobile workforce.
 
Presenters
Christina Fatzinger, Practice Improvement Specialist, University of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center
Russell Cripps, Practice Improvement Specialist, University of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center
Nadine Miller, Program Improvement Administrator, Montgomery County Office of Children & Youth
Kerry Greene, Ongoing Division Administrator, Montgomery County Office of Children & Youth
 
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM: Pennsylvania's Learning Solution for the Implementation of Extensive Legislative Change
Title: Pennsylvania's Learning Solution for the Implementation of Extensive Legislative Change
Garden State A, 1st Floor
 
In early 2014, the Pennsylvania legislature enacted a series of statutes that significantly amended Pennsylvania's child abuse laws creating challenges for the entire state's child welfare workforce responsible for their implementation. Through the collaboration of the PA Child Welfare Resource Center departments of Curriculum and Trainer Development, Organizational Effectiveness, and Technology in partnership with Pennsylvania's child welfare professionals, a multi-phase comprehensive learning solution was developed and implemented. The expedited and coordinated strategy included but was not limited to: an assessment of Pennsylvania's Counties readiness for change, online training, tools and resources, technical assistance, and transfer of learning. In totality, these provisions supported Pennsylvania child welfare professionals to build their capacity to integrate and implement these legislative changes. This workshop will outline the comprehensive multi-phase learning solution and reveal how the departments collaborated with each other and engaged its community partners in the development of the plan and its implementation. Tools and resources, including decision-trees, check-lists, and transfer of learning templates will be shared and demonstrated.
 
Presenters
Sharon England, Department Manager, Curriculum and Trainer Development, Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work
Matt Kerr, Department Manager, Technology Development, Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work
Kathleen Swain, Supervisor, Southeast Regional Team, Child Welfare Resource Center University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work
 
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM: Implicit Biases and Micro-Aggressions: Understanding the Impact on Training Design & Delivery
Title: Implicit Biases and Micro-Aggressions: Understanding the Impact on Training Design and Delivery
Garden State B, 1st Floor
 
Implicit biases can be defined as feelings, attitudes, stereotypes, and assumptions that we subconsciously hold about other people based on characteristics such as race, ethnicity, age, gender, gender identity, and appearance. They are pervasive and universal (we ALL have them), outside of conscious awareness, and often do not align with our declared belief system. Without deliberate thought or intention, implicit biases can significantly affect communication, decision-making, actions and behaviors. With research demonstrating that implicit biases contribute to inequalities in education, health care, employment, and the justice system, the implications are significant and far-reaching. Microaggressions, defined as brief, everyday exchanges that send a denigrating message to certain individuals based on their group membership, are closely tied to implicit biases in that they generally happen outside conscious awareness, and are often not intended to offend or cause harm. The good news is that the impact of implicit biases can be minimized and managed through self-awareness, education and exposure. This workshop will explore how unconscious biases may inadvertently inform the design and delivery of training, including curriculum content, material selection, classroom management, facilitation skills, and methods of instruction. Actionable strategies for mitigating the impact of implicit biases and micro-aggressions will be provided. Participants will examine how their own unconscious biases may play out in the classroom, with the goal of strengthening their training design and delivery skills.
 
Presenters
Jennifer Kelman, Director, Child Welfare Academy, School of Social Work
Tiffany Hancock, Assistant Director, Child Welfare Academy, School of Social Work
 
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM: A Multi-Measured Approach to Competence Assessment
Title: A Multi-Measure Approach to Competence Assessment
Garden State C, 1st Floor
 
Human service work has sometimes been described as more art than science. Effective practice requires competence in a variety of domains including interpersonal, intrapersonal (self-awareness), attitudinal, and professional judgment. The complexity of the work creates a significant challenge for evaluators attempting to effectively measure these varied domains contributing to effective practice in human services. In the absence of a "silver bullet" assessment tool, a multi-measure approach to assessing human service worker competence is arguably the most effective strategy to promote a competent and caring workforce. This workshop will explore the use of three assessment strategies (situational judgment exam, portfolio, supervisory assessment) used in an international child and youth care certification program administered by the Child and Youth Care Certification Board (Curry, Eckles, Stuart, Qaqish, 2010). Research results supporting the use of the multi-measure approach will be discussed (Curry, Schneider-Munoz, Eckles, & Stuart, 2013). Implications for use in other human service areas will be explored.
 
Presenters
Dale Curry, Professor, Human Development and Family Studies, Kent State University/School of Family and Consumer Studies
 
8:30 AM - 11:30 AM: Simulation
Title: New Jersey's Simulation Experience - Family Court Simulation (off-site - meet in the hotel lobby for transportation)
Offsite: Meet in Hotel Lobby
 
 
Presenters
Professor Joseph A. Del Russo JD
Susan H. Curcio, Esq.
 
Title: New Jersey's Simulation Experience - Car Seat Simulation (off-site - meet in the hotel lobby for transportation)
 
Did you know that between 73-80% of Child Restraints are critically misused? Critical misuse = Critical injury and/or death to a child in a motor vehicle crash. Come learn the importance of proper installation and adjustment of child restraints and get some hands on experience!
 
Presenters
Deborah Wenner, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
Colleen Ucal, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
 
Title: New Jersey's Simulation Experience - Child WelfareReferral Simulation (off-site - meet in the hotel lobby for transportation)
 
Engaging a family in crisis or who is in need of services that the family is unable to acquire without intervention from a child welfare system is daunting, even for the seasoned child welfare practitioner. For those who are new to child welfare it may appear to be insurmountable. Using a case simulation new child welfare practitioners are provided an opportunity to practice and to hone their engagement and interpersonal skills to make decisions and mistakes in a coaching and protective setting.
 
Presenters
Jarrertt White, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
Beverley Benjamin, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
Debra Marshall, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
Fatima Scipio, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
Dr. Neil Orkin, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
 
10:00 AM - 10:30 AM: Break
Title: Break
Regency Foyer, 1st Floor
 
 
 
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM: Reboot Your Delivery (BYOD)
Title: Reboot your Delivery (BYOD)
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
Are you stuck in lecture or question and answer delivery methods? Do you read SOPs or text to your audience and hope it sparks a discussion? A reboot of standard methods can greatly contribute to more memorable learning for participants. This presentation will explore similarities and differences between traditional and innovative delivery methods and demonstrate infusing technology into teaching and training. This interactive session will demonstrate the use of several delivery methods that are technology-based. We recommend that participants bring their own device (BYOD). Traditional delivery methods include lectures, question/answer sessions, raising hands to conduct polls, reading information from SOPs and documents, among others. It's always worthwhile to explore approaches that can renew content delivery methods. New methods and technology can be infused into teaching and training to serve as a reboot of standard methods. Examples of technology integration will be presented, and include the use of online polling, gamification of key concepts, among other methods. Each learning method that will be used as an example for this presentation has been tested and used in training courses. Most methods have had positive feedback and keep participants curious about more and different technological methods that will be used in future courses. Interactive elements of technology added to content delivery make learning more memorable for participants. There is a delicate balance between innovative and traditional delivery methods. Once the ideal combination of methods is defined, information can be effectively delivered to participants and increase the chances of retention.
 
Presenters
Victoria Gerstorfer, Instructional Desigener, New Jersey Child Support Institute-Institute for Families- School of Social Work- Rutgers University
Susan Bhuyan, Instructional Designer, New Jersey Child Support Institute (NJCSI)- Institute for Families- School of Social Work- Rutgers University
 
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM: Investing In What Matters: Cultivating a Resilient Workforce in Child Welfare
Title: Investing in What Matters: Cultivating a Resilient Workforce in Child Welfare
Regency B, 1st Floor
 
Social worker turnover is a national epidemic that child welfare leaders grapple with every day. In fact, research has found that turnover impacts timeliness of investigations, results in increased repeat maltreatment and delays for permanence for children in care - all outcomes for which child welfare leaders are responsible. As leaders in Health & Human Services organizations, our primary goal is to deliver services to our consumers and achieve positive outcomes for the persons with whom we are working at the lowest cost possible to taxpayers. The research is clear, in order to do that well, a leader must view their organization through a trauma informed, resiliency focused lens that concentrates on the essential element in service delivery- the workforce. This interactive presentation will focus on helping leaders to develop innovative approaches to further performance measures through well trained, qualified and empowered workforce. Participants will reflect on their own leadership, both day-to-day and in a crisis , in order go back to their organizations and do something differently. Reflective leaders understand that what got us here, will not necessarily take us to the next iteration of child welfare. Leaders who build a multi-disciplinary foundation that establishes a positive climate will result in a more resilient workforce, cost savings, and improved performance measures. Participants will learn concrete examples of how leaders who establish trust within the workforce can proactively lead during a crisis in way that both supports the staff & organization and responds to the community and political stakeholders.
 
Presenters
Angela Pittman, Senior Consultant, Public Consulting Group
Kay Casey, Senior Advisor, Public Consulting Group
 
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM: Mentoring Matters
Title: Mentoring Matters
Regency C, 1st Floor
 
Most people can count on their hands those important people that have been there to offer them support, guidance, and with whom they can share experiences. We call these significant people mentors. Mentoring happens when an influential relationship is formed and leads to the personal or professional growth of at least one of the individuals. That is what Franklin County Children Services (FCCS), in Columbus, OH has discovered. Agency staff want opportunities to develop potential, gain new experience, and hone their skills. People are seeking opportunities for advancement within the agency as well as increased global perspective. They are seeking connection and want to be engaged employees. In order to cultivate and develop agency staff in an ever changing workforce, FCCS has implemented a formalized mentoring program called S.A.I.L. The S.A.I.L. Program is about Shaping Attitudes, Inspiring Leadership. As a formalized mentoring program, S.A.I.L. seeks to capitalize on the natural talent that exists within the organization. It is a program that values connecting agency staff through cross-functional mentoring relationships, thereby benefiting all parties through mutual growth and learning. Entering into its third year, the S.A.I.L. Program is evolving as it examines program strengths and challenges. The S.A.I.L. Program at FCCS is an investment in agency staff, as we grow our staff to build up our community.
 
Presenters
Melissa Palmer, Leadership Developer, Franklin County Children Services
Shawney Johnson, Training Coordinator, Franklin County Children Services
 
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM: The Learning and Leadership Tool Kit: Making It Work For Your Agency
Title: The Learning & Living Leadership Tool Kit: Making it Work for Your Agency.
Garden State A, 1st Floor
 
Leadership happens when people both learn and live it. The National Child Welfare Workforce Institute presents a tool to help agencies grow leadership at all levels. Based upon the NCWWI Leadership Model, the tool kit supports the transfer of learning of competencies central to the NCWWI model yet applicable to any leadership development program. The tool kit offers activities for growing leadership competencies and includes worksheets and resources available in a highly interactive web-based format. Participants will learn how to implement the tool kit at local agencies to develop leadership capacity for the agency.
 
Presenters
Sharon Kollar, LINKD Implementation Coordinator, National Child Welfare Workforce Institute, University at Albany
Charmaine Brittain, Director of Organizational Development, Butler Institute for Families, University of Denver
 
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM: Love Notes: An Evidence Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Training Intervention Tested with Foster Youth
Title: Love Notes: An Evidence Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Training Intervention Tested with Foster Youth
Garden State B, 1st Floor
 
Youth in the foster care system are three times more likely to have children during their adolescent or early adulthood years than are other youth. The reasons for this high rate of pregnancy and parenting among foster youth are complicated. Many of these youth desire to have a family of their own to make up for their fractured family that entered the child welfare system. This presentation introduces participants to an evidence based teen pregnancy prevention curriculum that is embedded in a larger healthy relationship/violence prevention curriculum. Presenters will share results from an efficacy trial that included foster youth as well as content of the curriculum and how careful implementation and fidelity to the curriculum helped to ensure positive outcomes.
 
Presenters
Anita Barbee, Professor, Kent School of Social Work/University of Louisville
Becky Antle, Professor, Kent School of Social Work
 
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM: Lunch (On Your Own)
Title: Lunch (On Your Own)
 
 
 
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM: Simulation
Title: New Jersey's Simulation Experience - Family Court Simulation (off-site - meet in the hotel lobby for transportation)
Offsite: Meet in Hotel Lobby
 
 
Presenters
Professor Joseph A. Del Russo JD
Susan H. Curico, Esq.
 
Title: New Jersey's Simulation Experience - Car Seat Simulation (off-site - meet in the hotel lobby for transportation)
 
Did you know that between 73-80% of Child Restraints are critically misused? Critical misuse = Critical injury and/or death to a child in a motor vehicle crash. Come learn the importance of proper installation and adjustment of child restraints and get some hands on experience!
 
Presenters
Deborah Wenner, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
Colleen Ucal, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
 
Title: New Jersey's Simulation Experience - Child Welfare Referral Simulation (off-site - meet in the hotel lobby for transportation)
 
Engaging a family in crisis or who is in need of services that the family is unable to acquire without intervention from a child welfare system is daunting, even for the seasoned child welfare practitioner. For those who are new to child welfare it may appear to be insurmountable. Using a case simulation new child welfare practitioners are provided an opportunity to practice and to hone their engagement and interpersonal skills to make decisions and mistakes in a coaching and protective setting.
 
Presenters
Jarrertt White, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
Beverley Benjamin, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
Deborah Marshall, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
Fatima Scipio, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
Dr. Neil Orkin, Educational Program Development Specialist 1
 
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM: Micro Learning... Macro Results!
Title: Micro Learning...Macro Results!
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
According to Malcolm Knowles, who coined the term andragogy, adults will learn anything if it is relevant to their needs. As trainers we still fail to understand that adult learners simply want the content related to a task at hand at the time of need. The idea of micro-learning accommodates learner's needs to engage in mock activities of real life scenarios, which makes them prepared for on the job tasks. In this workshop, participatns will explore different applications of micro-learining and its benefits for the learners. Presenters will share the experience of transfroming a traditional classroom course into a blended learning course where micro-learning is appplied. Participants will view scenario-based activities that take the learners through tasks performed on the job without laoding them with unnecessary "nice-to-know" knowledge. They will also explore examples of bite-size learning as a follow-up method that promotes transfer of learning. Best practices and tips for creating scenario-based micro-learning and bite size follow-up training will be shared. Presenters will highlight at least two technologies that can be used to create these types of learning. The presenters will engage participants in discussion on challenges ad benefits of micro-learning.
 
Presenters
Sheila Blanton, Director, GA State University/Professional Excellence
Oliwia Wozniak, Instructional Design Specialist, Georgia State Univeristy Professional Excellence Program
Laura Schroeder, Instructional Technology Design Specialist, Georgia State Professional Excellence Program
 
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM: Effectively Engaging HR as a Strategic Partner for Transforming Human Services Agencies
Title: Effectively Engaging HR as a Strategic Partner for Transforming Human Services Agencies
Regency B, 1st Floor
 
Effective workforce development requires a broad array of partnerships yet HR is often missing from the table.Maintaining a stable, competent, well-trained workforce to support a health and human services system in these modern times is critical. While many people with a variety of skills need to be a part of the executive team, none may be as important as the HR department in its role to influence the direction of the organization; execute HR functions such as recruitment, selection, hiring and onboarding; influence structure and culture within the organization, and develop talent. This session will provide information on the results of a national survey designed to assess the effectiveness of the HR department in assisting in the modernization of H/HS. The survey titled, "HR as a Strategic Partner with Health and Human Services highlights best practices for effective relationships in four essential functions. The session will explore how to effectively engage with HR to positively impact workforce development. Through dialogue and activities, participants will come away with an action plan to engage HR as a strategic partner.
 
Presenters
Charmaine Brittain, Senior Associate, Graduate School of Social Work, University of Denver/Butler Institute for Families
Brian Howell, Associate Manager, Public Consulting Group
 
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM: Training in Classroom & Beyond (Part 1)
Title: Training in the Classroom and Beyond (Part 1)
Regency C, 1st Floor
 
For years training has been delivered in a program centric model which attempted to impart all aspects of a program to trainees by the end of their training with little emphasis on adult learning theory or analysis of staff competency. It is a new day and we need to shift the focus of training?from training to a policy and procedure manual to teaching our workforce how to engage with families. How do you train staff to engage with families? ?By making training engaging: using videos, web based training and cohort models to connect in a new way. Doing this outside of the classroom expands the reach with limited resources. ?Delving into tough topics like poverty and trauma informed care prepares staff for important conversations and improved outcomes. ?Feedback loops bring together leadership, trainers and the participants to increase engagement; including pre-requisites by giving everyone the same base knowledge coming into the classroom and builds the discussion so it can go further. How do you move the culture of your agency to support the vision of your guiding principles? ?Incorporating philosophy into the delivery of material ?Aligning process based training needs with the vision and guiding principles so individuals go back to do the job after the training and see that philosophy in the office How do you measure the investment in training in terms of the outcomes for the agency? ?Using metrics to evaluate based on competency at the end of training, post training and eventually by looking at staff retention rates ?Evaluating trainers competency ?Using assessments throughout training and determining plans for remediation when specific benchmarks are not achieved through classroom training In this presentation, we will provide tools, including innovative technology that we developed to answer these questions.
 
Presenters
Dawn Myers, Training Manager, OR Department of Human Services
 
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM: 50 Ways to Lose Your Lecture
Title: 50 Ways to Lose Your Lecture
Garden State A, 1st Floor
 
Ever wish you could use something other than a lecture to convey information and knowledge in a workshop or class? Have you ever found yourself frequently bored by relying too much on lectures when you build a curriculum? If you answered yes to either of these questions, this workshop is for you! This workshop will present a number of options for curriculum writers and trainers to use in their training design other than a lecture. Participants are encouraged to wear sneakers to this workshop as they will actively experience several interactive knowledge-transferring instructional techniques such as a taking a gallery walk, creating a graffiti wall, playing games, developing and implementing a debate, going on an information scavenger hunt, matching exercises, question walkabouts, and so many more! Come and enjoy learning how to make learning fun!
 
Presenters
Maureen Braun Scalera, Director, Office of Youth Empowerment, Rutgers School of Social Work
 
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM: Implementing Promising Strategies to Combat Secondary Traumatic Stress Among Public Child Welfare Workers
Title: Implementing Promising Strategies to Combat Secondary Traumatic Stress among Public Child Welfare Workers
Garden State B, 1st Floor
 
Public child welfare workers impacted by secondary traumatic stress (STS) may experience adverse consequences to their mental and physical health which can have professional and organizational consequences. It is important for child welfare organizations to institute programs and training that promote self-care strategies to encourage positive health outcomes of workers and overall well-being. As an initial step toward this goal, this workshop will provide participants with a clear understanding of compassion fatigue as it pertains to public child welfare workers and its impact on individual and organizational wellness. Such impacts include poor decision making, engaging in poor treatment planning, apathy, and making mistakes in determining children's safety. This workshop shares the results from a worker health survey examining the associations between compassion fatigue (i.e., burnout and secondary traumatic stress), organizational factors, and general health. After sharing the survey results, various resources and strategies are presented that may help public child welfare workers manage the stress associated with their work, such as self-care strategies, providing educational groups, and increased supervisory support. While preventing STS may be an impossible goal, implementing strategies to lessen the impacts is not. Self-care videos developed specifically for child social workers will be presented along with the results of a pilot skills-focused educational resilience building intervention administered to a group of social workers providing care to a highly traumatized group of children. Participants will be asked to reflect on their own levels of compassion fatigue by completing a self-assessment tool and then as a group collectively think of ways that their agencies and programs can help mitigate the impacts of secondary trauma and burnout.
 
Presenters
Alissa Sykes, Program Coordinator
 
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM: Evaluation 101
Title: Evaluation 101
Garden State C, 1st Floor
 
This workshop, designed for new training evaluators, administrators and others responsible for training evaluation, will introduce participants to how to plan an effective training evaluation using a real world scenario. Topics will include identifying your evaluation's scope and purpose, identifying evaluation questions and selecting evaluation designs and methods that will answer those questions. Participants will work through the steps in creating an evaluation plan using an example provided by the group of a real life evaluation they are responsible for developing.
 
Presenters
Cindy Parry, Consultant
 
3:00 PM - 3:30 PM: Break
Title: Break
Regency Foyer, 1st Floor
 
 
 
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM: Transfer of Learning with a Twist
Title: Transfer of Learning with a Twist
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
Technology has opened the door to ever changing and growing possibilities for keeping trainees connected to course content after a training event. Training follow up is one strategy for improving the transfer of learning from training. When integrated as a part of a training program's transfer design, these follow ups or training "boosts" can help to improve learning retention and increase the likelihood of training application. Innovative use of technology allows us to put a different twist on transfer of learning activities. In this workshop, participants will explore innovative uses of technology to design and deliver training boosts to promote learning transfer. Presenters will share their experiences and lessons learned from creating and delivering training boosts in their organization. Participants will be introduced to at least two different applications that can be used to deliver training boosts through various mobile platforms. Participants will learn best practices for design, development, and delivery of training boosts, participate in a demonstration of this technology, and engage in discussion about how these strategies might be used in their organizations to promote transfer of learning.
 
Presenters
Deidre Carmichael, Evaluation Specialist, GA State University/School of Social Work
Laura Schroeder, Instructional Technologist, Georgia State University School of Social Work
Sheila Blanton, Program Manager, Georgia State University School of Social Work
Liz Gallaspy, Senior Training Specialist, Georgia State University, School of Social Work Professional Excellence Program
 
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM: The Engagement- Harnessing Passion and Creativity; Engaging Learners Even With Topics You're Not "Married" To
Title: The Engagement- Harnessing Passion and Creativity; Engaging Learners Even With Topics You're Not "Married" To
Regency B, 1st Floor
 
Participants are not going to engage if you, as a trainer, are not engaged. In this workshop, we will discuss how to spark your own passion and creativity and then harness those powers to become a 10 karat trainer! Based in the theory of growth mindset and the happiness advantage, we will delve into activities to uncover what really motivates us as well as examine, first-hand, how creativity can increase our enjoyment in our work as well as the enjoyment and engagement of our participants. You will come away from this workshop with a smile on your face and some fun tools in your pocket!
 
Presenters
Tina Wright-Ervin, Social Work Training and Development Supervisor, San Bernardino County Performance, Education and Resource Centers
 
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM: Training in Classroom & Beyond (Part 2)
Title: Training in Classroom & Beyond (Part 2)
Regency C, 1st Floor
 
For years training has been delivered in a program centric model which attempted to impart all aspects of a program to trainees by the end of their training with little emphasis on adult learning theory or analysis of staff competency. It is a new day and we need to shift the focus of training from training to a policy and procedure manual to teaching our workforce how to engage with families.
 
Presenters
Dawn Myers
 
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM: Foundation Training and How It Affects Strong Agency Practice and Retention
Title: Foundation training and how it affects strong agency practice and retention.
Garden State A, 1st Floor
 
Learn a model for training Child Protection Social Caseworkers in their first 90 days of employment. The training focuses on CORE competencies, the adult phases of learning, supporting state training through transfer of learning, shadowing, field training, coaching and alumni support. The program adds consistency, efficacy and adherence to law for the entire agency.
 
Presenters
Joanne O'Callaghan, Child Welfare Training Supervisor, Denver Human Services
Sheri Dowler, MSW, Child Welfare Training Administrator II, Denver Department of Human Services
 
Tuesday, October 18th, 2016
7:30 AM - 8:30 AM: Breakfast
Title: Breakfast
Garden State Prefunction, 1st Floor
 
 
 
8:30 AM - 9:00 AM: Learning Circle 1
Title: Learning Circle: Driving Integration and Innovation - Is Training just in the Passenger Seat or Behind the Wheel?
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Christine Tappan
 
Title: Learning Circle: Learning Styles - Fact of Fiction?
Regency B, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Darlene Kelly
Paul Needham
 
Title: Learning Circle: How Valuable Really is the Human Services Value Curve?
Regency C, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Emily Campbell
Michelle Naples
 
Title: Learning Circle: Creating and Maintaining a Culture of Learning in Organizations
Garden State A, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Diana Cottrill
 
Title: Learning Circle: Is Free Really Better: Using Free or Low Cost Technology to Expand Training in and Out of the Classroom
Garden State B, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Sheila Blanton
 
Title: Learning Circle: Certification - Does it Matter?
Garden State C, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Dale Curry, Kent State University
Corrie Rice
 
Title: Learning Circle: Learning Evaluation Models - Does Your Evaluation Measure Up?
Conference A, 2nd Floor
 
 
Presenters
Jillian Schenck
 
Title: Learning Circle: What are the Components of an Effective Training System?
Salon D, 2nd Floor
 
 
Presenters
Jodi Hill-Lilly
Charmaine Brittain
 
Title: Learning Circle: Do Tests Really Matter?
Salon C, 2nd Floor
 
 
Presenters
Cynthia Parry
 
9:05 AM - 9:35 AM: Learning Circle 2
Title: Learning Circle: Driving Integration and Innovation - Is Training just in the Passenger Seat or Behind the Wheel?
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Christine Tappan
 
Title: Learning Circle: Learning Styles - Fact of Fiction?
Regency B, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Darlene Kelly
Paul Needham
 
Title: Learning Circle: How Valuable Really is the Human Services Value Curve?
Regency C, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Emily Campbell
Michelle Naples
 
Title: Learning Circle: Creating and Maintaining a Culture of Learning in Organizations
Garden State A, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Diana Cottrill
 
Title: Learning Circle: Is Free Really Better: Using Free or Low Cost Technology to Expand Training in and Out of the Classroom
Garden State B, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Sheila Blanton
 
Title: Learning Circle: Certification - Does it Matter?
Garden State C, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Dale Curry, Kent State University
Corrie Rice
 
Title: Learning Circle: Learning Evaluation Models - Does Your Evaluation Measure Up?
Conference A, 2nd Floor
 
 
Presenters
Jillian Schenck
 
Title: Learning Circle: What are the Components of an Effective Training System?
Salon D, 2nd Floor
 
 
Presenters
Jodi Hill-Lilly
Charmaine Brittain
 
Title: Learning Circle: Do Tests Really Matter?
Salon C, 2nd Floor
 
 
Presenters
Cynthia Parry
 
9:40 AM - 10:15 AM: Learning Circle 3
Title: Learning Circle: Driving Integration and Innovation - Is Training just in the Passenger Seat or Behind the Wheel?
Regency A, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Christine Tappan
 
Title: Learning Circle: Learning Styles - Fact of Fiction?
Regency B, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Darlene Kelly
Paul Needham
 
Title: Learning Circle: How Valuable Really is the Human Services Value Curve?
Regency C, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Emily Campbell
Michelle Naples
 
Title: Learning Circle: Creating and Maintaining a Culture of Learning in Organizations
Garden State A, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Diana Cottrill
 
Title: Learning Circle: Is Free Really Better: Using Free or Low Cost Technology to Expand Training in and Out of the Classroom
Garden State B, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Sheila Blanton
 
Title: Learning Circle: Certification - Does it Matter?
Garden State C, 1st Floor
 
 
Presenters
Dale Curry, Kent State University
Corrie Rice
 
Title: Learning Circle: Learning Evaluation Models - Does Your Evaluation Measure Up?
Conference A, 2nd Floor
 
 
Presenters
Jillian Schenck
 
Title: Learning Circle: What are the Components of an Effective Training System?
Salon D, 2nd Floor
 
 
Presenters
Jodi Hill-Lilly
Charmaine Brittain
 
Title: Learning Circle: Do Tests Really Matter?
Salon C, 2nd Floor
 
 
Presenters
Cynthia Parry
 
10:15 AM - 10:30 AM: Break
Title: Break
Garden State Prefunction, 1st Floor
 
 
 
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM: Closing Session
Title: Closing Session: Footprint and Footsteps
Brunswick Ballroom, Lower Level
 
 
Presenters
Pat Stanislaski, Director of Partnering, Prevention, LLC