Why Should You Attend the 2020 SASH Annual Conference?

Going Virtual in 2020

All times are Central Time.

Thursday, October 15th, 2020
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM: Mid-Morning Breakout
 
Why Talking About Sex is Essential for Partner Healing: A Posttraumatic Growth Model Following Intimate Betrayal
Research suggests that posttraumatic growth, a transformative process that impacts one's self-awareness and maladaptive core beliefs following trauma, can produce significant emotional and relational benefits (Tedeschi & Calhoun, 2004). In the case of intimate betrayal, an overlooked opportunity for posttraumatic growth lies in making changes to existing and potentially psychologically damaging beliefs around sexuality.
Betrayed partners often report significant distress around their sexuality as well as their partners. Such distress can include; adverse beliefs about eroticism (fantasy and stimuli), negative perceptions of their bodies, distressing intrusive thoughts and images relating to sexual acts, maladaptive beliefs regarding sexual desire and masturbation, and depersonalization during sexual activity. Furthermore, partners often avoid conversations about sex with their significant other and/or therapist which can maintain symptomatology, fuel feelings of guilt and shame when they do engage in sexual acts and perpetuate stigma and negative schemas around sex. In turn, this maladaptive narrative around sexuality reinforces unhealthy core beliefs and perpetuates trauma suffering.
Current partner trauma treatment models lack an in-depth integration of sexual health. Moreover, they tend to shy away from embracing conversations about sex, overtly perpetuate sexual myths and misinformation, and unintentionally encourage avoidance of conversations about sexuality until much later in treatment. These models, albeit well-meaning, may inadvertently be reinforcing beliefs about what constitutes "unhealthy sexuality." We propose a more inclusive treatment model that is in line with current research and uses posttraumatic growth principles to foster healing and necessitate discussion of healthy sexuality as part of the growth process to resolve trauma after intimate betrayal.
Learning Objective #1: Participants will be able to apply posttraumatic growth principles to the exploration of core beliefs about healthy sexuality following intimate partner betrayal.
Learning Objective #2: Participants will be able to describe strategies to assess for the maladaptive core beliefs about sexuality following intimate partner betrayal.
Learning Objective #3: Participants will be able to create the development of a healthy narrative of sexuality following intimate partner betrayal.
Level of audience: Beginner
Available CE Credits: 1.5
SASH Credential Education Credit Objective #1: CPSBT1d treatment for affected family members or CSRTT1d sexual resilience (health, empowerment, safety, and fulfillment) in the aftermath of trauma.
SASH Credential Education Credit Objective #2: CPSBT1d treatment for affected family member or CSRTT1a psychological, biological, emotional, and social experiences of survivors in the aftermath of trauma and posttraumatic symptoms and etiology or 1d sexual resilience (health, empowerment, safety, and fulfillment) in the aftermath of trauma.
SASH Credential Education Credit Objective #3: CPSBT1d treatment for affected family members or CSRTT1d sexual resilience (health, empowerment, safety, and fulfillment) in the aftermath of trauma.
 
Shira Olsen, Pacific Behavioral Healthcare, Co-owner
Dr. Shira Olsen is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Sex Therapist, Certified Sex Addiction Therapist, Certified Clinical Partner Specialist and co-founder of Pacific Behavioral Healthcare, an specialty outpatient clinic for treating complex sexual health and intimacy concerns. Dr. Olsen specializes in sex therapy and trauma treatment. She is a contributing author to Facilitating Resilience and Recovery Following Trauma and has published numerous empirical articles on the topic of betrayal trauma. Dr. Olsen works with individuals struggling with sexual and intimacy concerns, to include desire discrepancies, erotic conflicts, sexual dysfunctions, sexual communication, and sexual trauma. She also helps clients work through the pain of intimate betrayal and move towards growth. In her work, she draws upon a vast knowledge of empirical research in sexual health, trauma and relationships. She utilizes best practices to provide education and realistic hope for restoration and reconnection.

Victoria Schroder, Pacific Behavioral Healthcare, Psychologist
Victoria Schroder is a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology and is currently completing her internship at Pacific Behavioral Healthcare, an outpatient treatment clinic in Bellevue, WA specializing in the integration of sexuality, intimacy, and mental health. Victoria works primarily with individuals struggling with sexual compulsivity, intimate partner betrayal, and sexual intimacy. She conducts both individual and group therapy for individuals struggling with these various issues and also conducts psychological assessments to assess for underlying mental health concerns and comorbidities. Additionally, she is currently pursuing professional certifications in sex therapy and trauma. She utilizes a systems-based, trauma and attachment informed approach to sexual health and wellness supported by the latest empirical research in sexual health, trauma, and relationships.