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CE Credit and Course Completion 

In order to earn CE credit, attendees must fully attend each registered session for which they are registered and complete a session evaluation. Certificates of completion will be accessible to attendees who meet these requirements upon completion of the session evaluation. Partial credit will not be granted for partial attendance in a session.


 
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Thursday, October 15th, 2020
8:00 AM - 7:00 PM: Bend and Stretch Break Room
Join conference attendees in our virtual breakroom and enjoy networking and conversation with your colleagues.

In the breakroom, you can find the virtual bookstore and the activity room.
 
8:00 AM - 10:00 AM: Morning Breakout
90 Minute Session
Michael Crocker
If a client cannot experience guilt, should we shrug our shoulders and claim him to be a sociopath or psychopath. No, we should not. Even those labels are misnomers and much more complicated than what we make them out to be.

It has been theorized how the search for punishment could act as a defense against the affectual experience of guilt. So many of our clients state they deserve to be thrown out of the house, beaten, cursed at, kept from their children, subjugated; and yet their guilt is not experienced. They instead focus on the punishment, both feeling they deserve it, yet feeling victim to it.

The defense against true guilt- both historical and contemporary- is defended by the need for punishment. Guilt brings with it sadness and often regret. The desire for punishment can be stimulating, exciting and result in defiance and destruction. It doesn't work. It is often part of the cycle of sexual compulsion.

Additionally, men are socialized out of their emotions. This puts them at a terrible disadvantage in terms of emotional literacy and the capacity to use their feelings relationally. Clinically, men must be trained to feel.

As clinicians at the 'Sexuality, Attachment and Trauma Project', we are beginning to realize we must be more active with the men that create punishment in their lives and then assume that this punishment is 'deserved' while still lacking awareness of guilt, grief and/or agency. We have to help them find their way.
 
90 Minute Session
Matthew Hedelius
This seminar is for professionals both new to the field of sexual health and already working in it. It addresses various labels for problematic sexual behavior as well as categorizing the types of behaviors for which people seek treatment. Sexual behavior that is problematic for some people may not be for others, and attendees will be given a framework to help them distinguish potential problems from healthy sexual behavior, as well as a list of potential risk factors that appear to contribute to the development of problems. Participants will review recent research on the effects of internet pornography , including effects on the brain, as well as the new diagnosis called "Compulsive Sexual Behavior Disorder" to be implemented via the World Health Organization's upcoming diagnostic manual, The International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). Finally, attendees will learn about treatment options, plus support options for those affected and their partners.
 
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM: Mid-Morning Breakout
90 Minute Session
Shira Olsen
Co-Presenter(s)
Victoria Schroder
Research suggests that posttraumatic growth, a transformative process that impacts one's self-awareness and maladaptive core beliefs following trauma, can produce significant emotional and relational benefits (Tedeschi & Calhoun, 2004). In the case of intimate betrayal, an overlooked opportunity for posttraumatic growth lies in making changes to existing and potentially psychologically damaging beliefs around sexuality.
Betrayed partners often report significant distress around their sexuality as well as their partners. Such distress can include; adverse beliefs about eroticism (fantasy and stimuli), negative perceptions of their bodies, distressing intrusive thoughts and images relating to sexual acts, maladaptive beliefs regarding sexual desire and masturbation, and depersonalization during sexual activity. Furthermore, partners often avoid conversations about sex with their significant other and/or therapist which can maintain symptomatology, fuel feelings of guilt and shame when they do engage in sexual acts and perpetuate stigma and negative schemas around sex. In turn, this maladaptive narrative around sexuality reinforces unhealthy core beliefs and perpetuates trauma suffering.
Current partner trauma treatment models lack an in-depth integration of sexual health. Moreover, they tend to shy away from embracing conversations about sex, overtly perpetuate sexual myths and misinformation, and unintentionally encourage avoidance of conversations about sexuality until much later in treatment. These models, albeit well-meaning, may inadvertently be reinforcing beliefs about what constitutes "unhealthy sexuality." We propose a more inclusive treatment model that is in line with current research and uses posttraumatic growth principles to foster healing and necessitate discussion of healthy sexuality as part of the growth process to resolve trauma after intimate betrayal.
 
90 Minute Session
Elizabeth York
A traumatic brain injury, even a mild one, can affect many areas of one's life. Studies show that differing degrees of a variety of effects can include; cognitive and memory issues, emotional instability, depression, plus various other effects occurring after a brain injury from mild concussion to severe TBI. Studies have also shown that TBI can lead to sexual dysfunction including changes in desire, energy and libido, ED, changes in ability to achieve erection or orgasm, intimacy and relationship issues, and more. This presentation helps professionals recognize the symptoms of sexual dysfunction, discusses the research, and presents an opportunity to learn more about TBI and how to help those experiencing its symptoms and effects.
 
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM: Keynote Session
90 Minute Session
Elizabeth Smart
Come hear Elizabeth speak about her journey of recovery and her message of hope and healing.
Approved for NYSE: No
Approved for APA Credit: No
Approved for NASW: No
 
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM: Afternoon Breakout
90 Minute Session
Sue Neufeld-Ellis
Experience a sample of a Mindful Self-Compassion practice that will assist you, as a clinician, as well as your clients, in dealing with stress, uncomfortable feelings, and unwanted behaviors. These practices can also assist you in becoming calmer and more resilient. I will present some of the history and research, as well as what Mindfulness and Inquiry both "is and isn't". I will share how I have used it with clients who have Problematic Sexual behaviors/Partners/Couples and other addictive behaviors for the past 6 years.
 
3:45 PM - 5:15 PM: Late Afternoon Breakout
90 Minute Session
A. Todd Freestone
This presentation will address the darker sides of pornography. Topics covered will include; Deep Fake Pornography, Revenge Pornography, Snuff Pornography, Incest Pornography, Hentai, Child Sexual Abuse Images (formerly called Child Pornography), plus other classifications of pornography that clients with whom you will be working at some time in your practice may access. There will also will be discussion about the distribution methods of this type of pornographjy (The Dark Web) and why this is not eliminated. This presentation will also talk about the theoretical underpinnings of and the diagnosis of underaged sexual arousal patterns.
 
90 Minute Session
Crystal Ellis
Less than 40% of adults over the age of 50 report having discussed sex with a physician. Doctors frequently report discomfort initiating sexual assessments with older patients due to assumed asexuality and other prioritized physical ailments. Over-prescribing erectile dysfunction medication mustn't be a universal "fix" for sexual dysfunction. Instead, physicians must address personal biases against sexually active older adults, and collaborate across disciplines to provide holistic care. This workshop helps physicians and health professionals effectively incorporate the "Do Ask, Do Tell" PLISSIT Model to assess sexual function, to encourage healthy conversations about sex, and to advocate for their patients' pleasure.
 
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM: Thursday Moderated Table Discussion
Moderated Table Discussion
Patrick Hentsch
The Emotional-Developmental Model of Intimacy presents an original, coherent conceptual framework that provides insight into why and how partners unwittingly obstruct the intimate connection they need and desire. It exposes fundamental developmental and emotional factors and functions which inform a person's capacity to co-create and experience interpersonal intimacy.

This model has developed as a result of the author's empirical clinical experience in couples' counseling. It offers insight into the nature of the dynamic processes between partners that persistently obstruct the intimate connection that partners need. It addresses, in developmental and emotional terms, why and how all humans dynamically embody the paradox of both seeking interpersonal intimacy and avoiding it. It clarifies how the point of dynamic equilibrium between these opposite motivations maintains itself as a systems phenomenon in couples. Corrective pathways will be explored for both the counselor and their clients to disrupt and reorganize the point of equilibrium, leading to the possibility of more effective, intimate connection. While many couple counseling sessions are consumed by attempts to resolve content-based issues and differences, this author finds that in the majority of cases, the process-based issue is singularly universal: partners are attempting to resolve between each other—by misguided attribution of "cause and effect"—the self-contained paradox of seeking and avoiding intimacy within each partner. Vulnerability and authenticity are two original human states that are necessary for the effective development of self through relationships. This model exposes how developmental experiences and their emotions affect the individual's capacity to invoke those states.
 
Moderated Table Discussion
Diane Hovey
There are some profound experiences for which words can fail. The use of PhotoTherapy cards helps unfold the reality of experience and achieve a new level of understanding and insight while both lifting the fog of ambiguity and taming chaos.
Language structures meaning, determines how we see things, is the carrier of our culture, and affects our world view. Yet, in times of trial and overwhelming challenge, words are simply not enough to convey the thoughts and feelings of experience. At these times, it is helpful to step outside the typical mode of communication. The use of photos helps us move beyond language-bound barriers. It opens a new way to view and express experience. It also gives the therapist or even the individual an opening into the experience without the preconceived notion that they already know or will find the answers. It opens possibilities not otherwise considered through words alone.
Because photos are part of our cultural fabric, their use is comfortable. It therefore allows an individual or client to more actively engage in the discovery process and move toward the construction of new meanings suited to healing and growth. As a result, they will feel better understood and more invested in their own healing process.
 
Moderated Table Discussion
Pete Cooper
This will be a roundtable discussion about sexual compulsivity in those experiencing bipolar mania and if this sexual compulsivity is tantamount to sexual addiction or sexual trauma and if it should be treated as such or as separate entities. We are aware of universal themes of bipolar disorder. However, those who deal with it do so in their own unique way of how they experience it for themselves. Bipolar mania can take many different shapes and forms for those who deal with or suffer from it, and as we know, there are many different types and levels of severity of bipolar disorder. In this round table discussion, we are trying to pinpoint sexually compulsive behavior in those with bipolar mania and if this behavior could or should be classified and treated as a sexual addiction. The moderator will submit research supporting the existence of sexual addiction and attendees are encouraged to bring supporting research to discuss their position on how sexually compulsive behavior in those with bipolar mania should be treated.
 
Moderated Table Discussion
Janie Lacy
This workshop will address the painful and addictive love and sex process that negatively impacts not only the love and sex addict, but also the individuals with whom they are in relationship. Topics include what happens in the brain that makes it hard to break the cycle, highlights of cultural factors and attachment patterns (attachment theory - John Bowlby) that lead to craving the perfect partner who will bring endless happiness, plus best practices to healing love and sexual trauma.
 
Moderated Table Discussion
Troy Love
In this presentation, attendees are introduced to Attachment Wounds and associated negative core messages, written into the nervous system, which then become the filter for how life is viewed. We explore how shame promotes numbing behaviors, including compulsive sexually addictive behaviors. We also explore how "wound care" can help heal the wounds and thus change the paradigm in which we view the world.
 
Friday, October 16th, 2020
8:00 AM - 9:30 AM: #JointheConversation Panel
120 Minute Session
Matthew Hedelius
Co-Presenter(s)
Zoë Peterson
Chris Fariello
Shan Jumper
Why are there so many sexuality organizations? It's hard to decide who to listen to, where to turn for accurate information and which to join. Wouldn't it be easier if we, as professionals, had one organization for all our information? SASH has long believed there is room at the table for all sexual health ideas and that the diversity of organizations are necessary to provide the public, professionals and clinicians with necessary information. To learn more about other viewpoints, SASH invited the Presidents of other non-profit sexuality organizations to join us for #JointheConversation Presidents Panel and share their vision of sexual health and wellness. The panel will also discuss how they believe their organization fits with others and how future collaboration can make sexual health a common topic and vision for all. Join the Presidents of SASH, AASECT, SSSS and ATSA in bringing us together.
 
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM: ATSA Breakout
90 Minute Session
Maia Christopher
Session information forthcoming. Stay Tuned
 
90 Minute Session
Shan Jumper
This workshop will describe the indefinite confinement to mental facility of individuals based on predictions of future sexually harmful behaviors. The second-generation commitment laws, often referred to as 'Sexually Violent Predator' laws, began appearing in the 1990's as a legislative response to high profile, horrific sexual crimes. The procedure and trends of civil commitment in the United States will be described, as will approaches to assessing and treating such an individual's risk for sexual violence. The workshop will also focus on the challenge of establishing therapeutic rapport and motivation for change in persons mandated to the treatment setting and will discuss special populations presenting for treatment in civil commitment centers, such as transgender individuals, men on the autism spectrum. The ethical and legal ramifications for this controversial approach to sexual violence prevention will also be discussed.

ATSA
ATSA's origins date back to the early 1980s, when a group of Oregon treatment providers, researchers, and other practitioners began meeting each month to discuss assessment methods and treatment options for sexually aggressive adults in Oregon State Hospital and other institutions. From these monthly lunch meetings emerged a shared desire to develop practice standards for evaluating and treating sexual abusers.

As the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers, ATSA has grown into an international organization of more than 3,000 members representing approximately 20 countries. ATSA sets standards and practice guidelines for treatment providers; produces a code of ethics for practitioners; produces the highly ranked peer-reviewed journal, Sexual Abuse; hosts the world's largest annual conference and leading educational venue for professionals working on issues related to the treatment, management, and research of sexual abuse; and provides Continuing Education classes to help practitioners gain and maintain up-to-date information on current research and evidence-based best practices.

ATSA's mission is to make society safer by preventing sexual abuse. To achieve that, ATSA continues to support and promote sound research, effective practice, informed policy, and comprehensive prevention strategies.
 
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM: Carnes Keynote
90 Minute Session
Bill Herring
Based on his article of the same name, which was awarded "Article of the Year" in the journal, Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity, this presentation describes a theory-neutral framework for categorizing varieties of problematic sexual behavior. It utilizes established measures of sexual health to arrive at a method for distinguishing forms of problematic sexual behavior without reference to the type and/or frequency of sexual activity, thus making it applicable to a diverse range of client populations. This framework includes five basic questions to enhance sexual health conversations about various forms of problematic sexual behavior. The framework avoids the use of labels in order to enhance inter-disciplinary collaboration across theoretical formulations. The framework is also used in the SASH "ATPSB" certificate training program.
 
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM: AASECT Breakout
90 Minute Session
AASECT Presenter Information Coming Soon
Session information forthcoming. Stay Tuned
 
90 Minute Session
AASECT Presenter #1
Session information forthcoming. Stay Tuned.

AASECT
Founded in 1967, the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists (AASECT) is devoted to the promotion of sexual health by the development and advancement of the fields of sexual therapy, counseling, and education. AASECT's mission is the advancement of the highest standards of professional practice for educators, counselors and therapists. AASECT affirms the fundamental value of sexuality as an inherent, essential, and beneficial dimension of being human. AASECT accepts as its mission the advancement of the highest standards of professional practice for educators, counselors and therapists. In general, AASECT opposes all psychological, social, cultural, legislative, and governmental forces that would restrict, curtail or interfere with the fundamental values of sexual health and sexual freedom that we espouse. AASECT also opposes all abuses of sexuality including, but not limited to, harassment, intimidation, coercion, prejudice, and the infringement of any individual's sexual and civil rights.

The American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists (AASECT) is a not-for-profit, interdisciplinary professional organization. In addition to sexuality educators, sexuality counselors and sex therapists, AASECT members include physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, allied health professionals, clergy members, lawyers, sociologists, marriage and family counselors and therapists, family planning specialists and researchers, as well as students in various relevant professional disciplines. These individuals share an interest in promoting understanding of human sexuality and healthy sexual behavior.
 
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM: Friday Moderated Table Discussion
Moderated Table Discussion
Pete Cooper
This will be a roundtable discussion about sexual compulsivity in those experiencing bipolar mania and if this sexual compulsivity is tantamount to sexual addiction or sexual trauma and if it should be treated as such or as separate entities. We are aware of universal themes of bipolar disorder. However, those who deal with it do so in their own unique way of how they experience it for themselves. Bipolar mania can take many different shapes and forms for those who deal with or suffer from it, and as we know, there are many different types and levels of severity of bipolar disorder. In this round table discussion, we are trying to pinpoint sexually compulsive behavior in those with bipolar mania and if this behavior could or should be classified and treated as a sexual addiction. The moderator will submit research supporting the existence of sexual addiction and attendees are encouraged to bring supporting research to discuss their position on how sexually compulsive behavior in those with bipolar mania should be treated.
 
Moderated Table Discussion
Patrick Hentsch
The Emotional-Developmental Model of Intimacy presents an original, coherent conceptual framework that provides insight into why and how partners unwittingly obstruct the intimate connection they need and desire. It exposes fundamental developmental and emotional factors and functions which inform a person's capacity to co-create and experience interpersonal intimacy.

This model has developed as a result of the author's empirical clinical experience in couples' counseling. It offers insight into the nature of the dynamic processes between partners that persistently obstruct the intimate connection that partners need. It addresses, in developmental and emotional terms, why and how all humans dynamically embody the paradox of both seeking interpersonal intimacy and avoiding it. It clarifies how the point of dynamic equilibrium between these opposite motivations maintains itself as a systems phenomenon in couples. Corrective pathways will be explored for both the counselor and their clients to disrupt and reorganize the point of equilibrium, leading to the possibility of more effective, intimate connection. While many couple counseling sessions are consumed by attempts to resolve content-based issues and differences, this author finds that in the majority of cases, the process-based issue is singularly universal: partners are attempting to resolve between each other—by misguided attribution of "cause and effect"—the self-contained paradox of seeking and avoiding intimacy within each partner. Vulnerability and authenticity are two original human states that are necessary for the effective development of self through relationships. This model exposes how developmental experiences and their emotions affect the individual's capacity to invoke those states.
 
Moderated Table Discussion
Diane Hovey
There are some profound experiences for which words can fail. The use of PhotoTherapy cards helps unfold the reality of experience and achieve a new level of understanding and insight while both lifting the fog of ambiguity and taming chaos.
Language structures meaning, determines how we see things, is the carrier of our culture, and affects our world view. Yet, in times of trial and overwhelming challenge, words are simply not enough to convey the thoughts and feelings of experience. At these times, it is helpful to step outside the typical mode of communication. The use of photos helps us move beyond language-bound barriers. It opens a new way to view and express experience. It also gives the therapist or even the individual an opening into the experience without the preconceived notion that they already know or will find the answers. It opens possibilities not otherwise considered through words alone.
Because photos are part of our cultural fabric, their use is comfortable. It therefore allows an individual or client to more actively engage in the discovery process and move toward the construction of new meanings suited to healing and growth. As a result, they will feel better understood and more invested in their own healing process.
 
Moderated Table Discussion
Janie Lacy
This workshop will address the painful and addictive love and sex process that negatively impacts not only the love and sex addict, but also the individuals with whom they are in relationship. Topics include what happens in the brain that makes it hard to break the cycle, highlights of cultural factors and attachment patterns (attachment theory - John Bowlby) that lead to craving the perfect partner who will bring endless happiness, plus best practices to healing love and sexual trauma.
 
Moderated Table Discussion
Troy Love
In this presentation, attendees are introduced to Attachment Wounds and associated negative core messages, written into the nervous system, which then become the filter for how life is viewed. We explore how shame promotes numbing behaviors, including compulsive sexually addictive behaviors. We also explore how "wound care" can help heal the wounds and thus change the paradigm in which we view the world.
 
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM: Sexual Wellness Event Session 1
Sexual Health Awareness Day
Dr. Robert Weiss
"Codependent No More" became a self-help book sensation nearly 40 years ago, and ever since, we've seen a torrent of book titles, articles, workshops, and even whole therapy establishments centered around this therapy concept. Codependency is what we know. But codependency has never been formalized as a diagnosis in the DMS or the ICD. Not ever! In fact, there has never been a formal, criteria-based addiction or mental health diagnosis for the "issue" that we call codependency. So, what does this mean to our work today? Which one of the 340+ books on this topic holds the 'right' method? Perhaps codependency requires a review for 2020. This thought-provoking talk by treatment specialist, author, and speaker Dr. Robert Weiss LCSW asks attendees to question old assumptions and consider new ideas, ensuring the work we provide remains strength-based, useful and deeply compassionate.
Approved for NYSE: No
Approved for APA Credit: No
Approved for NASW: No
 
7:45 PM - 9:15 PM: Sexual Wellness Event Session 2
Sexual Health Awareness Day
Kristen A. Jenson
Children who are taught to recognize pornography, report exposure, and reject porn's harmful messages are safer from sexual exploitation of all kinds. Adult predators use pornography to desensitize victims and normalize sexual behavior between adults and children. When children report exposure to pornography, potential abusers can be identified earlier, thus decreasing opportunities for further abuse. The fact that pornography is used to groom children is well established, but pornography has become a perpetrator itself--fueling a disturbing rise in child-on-child harmful sexual behavior.

Children who learn and practice porn refusal skills will be less likely to view pornography and reenact sexual acts on more vulnerable children. They will also learn to reject the self-objectification of sexting and avoid the traps of sextortion.

Participants will leave this presentation with research linking pornography with child sexual abuse; age-appropriate messages to teach children about pornography; and resources to help children develop porn-refusal skills.
Approved for NYSE: No
Approved for APA Credit: No
Approved for NASW: No
 
Saturday, October 17th, 2020
6:00 AM - 7:30 AM: Sexual Wellness Session 3
Sexual Health Awareness Day
Catherine Etherington
Ouch! Forgiveness??
No-one ever told you that love could hurt?! Or maybe they did, but you didn't think it would be THIS bad!! Almost all adult relationships require a level of grace and forgiveness; but betrayal recovery demands something uniquely difficult when it comes to "the F word", whether the relationship survives or not.
In this 90 minute presentation, we will tackle the ever challenging topic of forgiveness for those seeking healing after sexual betrayal. We will take a look at the research available on the topic and relate it to the betrayal recovery experience, exploring some of the challenges and offering new ways to think and talk about this topic with your clients.
Developed with the primary focus on addressing forgiveness in response to sexual betrayal, Cat's presentation, and the research materials, will also be helpful for those working with survivors of sexual trauma in various forms (abuse, assault, violation, etc).
Approved for NYSE: No
Approved for APA Credit: No
Approved for NASW: No
 
8:00 AM - 9:30 AM: Sexual Wellness Session 4
Sexual Health Awareness Day
Gaelyn Emerson
As sexual health specialists, we help clients navigate a lifetime of ongoing sexual awareness and evolution. We witness their transitions through predictable stages of sexual development, accompanied by LESS predictable stages of emotional, social and relational experiences. In this refreshingly narrative and inspiring workshop, divorce specialist Gaelyn Rae Emerson applies her work with more than one hundred divorced and permanently separated women— each following the end of an intimate relationship predicated by sexual infidelity, deception or rejection— to a presentation that features the high, low and "oh, hell no!" moments of her clients' reentry into single sexuality. With passion and humor, Gaelyn presents an eclectic spectrum of socially diverse case studies, each chosen to broaden our professional understanding of women's most private sexual segues. Arrive to this workshop prepared to say "I didn't see THAT coming," and then leave with newfound appreciation and respect for this unique (and often underestimated) demographic.
Approved for NYSE: No
Approved for APA Credit: No
Approved for NASW: No
 
8:00 AM - 9:30 AM: Morning Breakout
90 Minute Session
Laney Knowlton
Healthy sexuality can be a very triggering topic for both partners and addicts. Partners may fear being told that their needs are wrong yet again, that they aren't allowed to say no, that they aren't allowed to be themselves, or that their trauma related to sexuality may be so deep that healing connection in this area feels impossible. Addicts often fear that they will be told sexuality is not a need and that they are not allowed to want it or to be themselves, or they only understand sex as a way to control and manipulate. At the core, both partners and addicts often struggle to find safety and peace in sexual connection. Healthy sexuality is not about having more sex or becoming something that someone else, or society, thinks you "should" become. It is about connecting to yourself emotionally and physically, and sharing that connection with someone else in a safe way that makes you feel more whole and connected. Between the influence of the addiction, family-of-origin, and society, many of the problems with physical intimacy for partners and addicts are trauma-related. Understanding the way each of these facets influences sexuality, and knowing how to help clients process through and heal from them is essential to long-term recovery. Additionally, steps to help clients work to reincorporate physical intimacy into their lives in a way that includes emotional and physical safety, along with empathy and the ability to work towards balanced connection, is crucial.
 
90 Minute Session
James Annear
Co-Presenter(s)
Sharon Rinearson
In a world that clamors to emphasize the importance of social sex education, messages about sexual intimacy (versus sexual intensity) tend to get lost in the dialogue. Sadly, this is often as true for mature adults as for younger individuals. As specialists within the field of sexual health, we see these clients flooding our offices. They're eager to improve their sex lives, yet painfully disconnected from the inner wisdom necessary to make great sex possible- emotional safety, relational courage and intimate connection. This is especially true for clients actively healing from problematic sexual behavior and/or partner betrayal, compounding the potential risks (and possible rewards) for both parties. Can sexual intimacy really be as satisfying as sexual intensity? And if so, how do we integrate emotional intimacy into relationships that are predictably safe, profoundly brave and powerfully sexy?
 
10:00 AM - 11:30 PM: Mid-morning Breakout
90 Minute Session
Jeff Logue
This workshop explores the growing problem of online infidelity and the challenges it creates in marriage. Attendees will examine the various perceptions of online infidelity and how new media formats compare to traditional infidelity. Demographic information from the 2015 AshleyMadison.com data breach reveals important market determinants. Attendees will evaluate the role of pornography on marital quality and its effects on heterosexual marriages.
 
90 Minute Session
Erica Sarr
Problems with sexual functioning are often very difficult for clients to bring up in session. Indeed, many struggling with erectile issues may not even address these concerns with medical providers, much less their therapist. Problems with erection not only affect a client's sexual life, but their romantic relationships, body image and sense of masculinity. The causes of erectile dysfunction are varied- from medical complications and aging to anxiety and a consequence of compulsive behavior. This presentation aims to look at both the psychological factors which may complicate erectile difficulties, but also how to address feelings of shame, anger, and grief related to both ongoing issues and new loss of functioning.
 
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM: Afternoon Breakout
90 Minute Session
Cameron Staley
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a transdiagnostic treatment that has been found efficacious for a wide range of problems across over 300 randomized controlled trials including compulsive disorders such as pornography viewing (Twohig & Crosby, 2016). ACT provides a comprehensive framework for addressing core pathological processes underlying problematic pornography viewing including psychological inflexibility (Wetterneck, Burgess, Short, Smith, & Cervantes, 2012; Levin, Lillis, & Hayes, 2012), low trait-mindfulness (Reid, Bramen, & Anderson 2013), emotion dysregulation (Bancroft, & Vukadinovic 2004), rigid adherence to inner experiences (e.g., urges, thoughts, emotions), and moral disapproval (Grubbs, Perry, & Wilt, 2018). This presentation will demonstrate how ACT principles effectively reduce unwanted pornography viewing by cultivating openness to experiencing urges to view pornography and by promoting value-directed behaviors instead of ineffective efforts to control inner experiences.
 
90 Minute Session
Mark Drax
Mark facilitates workshops to help men safely explore their most shameful and debilitating secrets. These workshops have revealed how often men protect mothers while pouring scorn and blame on fathers, the 'acceptable' target for their trauma and wrath. This presentation will address this confusing inequity. A mother's emotional leadership is equally if not more important to a young man's emotional growth than what he learns from his father. Society teaches young men to put mothers on a pedestal, despite abuse from supposedly 'perfect' mothers that can generate deep rage within a child who may grow up feeling betrayed by his mother while still consciously defending her. This is a lynchpin dynamic that accounts for the abuse women suffer from men, so often without either understanding 'why'! Whatever we're exposed to after birth fills the all-seeking hugely impressionable void within us and becomes our learning. If this learning is muddied with a lack of attention, unhealthy attachment, frightening behaviours or worse, children learn to fear the world and seek to fill their perception of reality with anything outside of themselves that satiates this inner fear and pain. The perfect setup for addiction, external physical and emotional 'medicine' becomes their norm and so often, intensity replaces intimacy. Separation from our original, innocent self continues until prompted by deepening pain and unmanageability to stop, look inwards and uncover the sacred importance of who we've become Vs who we want to be. We need truth and intimacy, and that starts with ourselves!
 
1:45 PM - 3:15 PM: Mid-Afternoon Breakout
90 Minute Session
Andrew Susskind
As a psychotherapist and sex addict who's been in twelve-step recovery for more than twenty-five years, I've witnessed thousands of clients, colleagues and friends struggle with problematic sexual behavior and its consequences. And there's one thing I know for sure: compulsive sexual behavior is not about sex: it's about deep-rooted challenges with intimacy and love.

It's been five decades since Elisabeth Kubler-Ross introduced the five stages of loss; but how do you apply them with your clients today? In this workshop, you'll see how this age-old theory relates to sex addiction and how there are five stages of gratitude that correlate with it. Positive psychologists have shown that practicing gratitude is essential for life contentment, and their research can also be applied to long-term recovery. As we examine the stages of loss - denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance - participants will take a fresh look at the losses and gains associated with grief and gratitude.

In my office and in the twelve-step rooms, the suffering continues, and while some people are able to find a life of integrity and direction, not everyone gets traction. At this time, there is little focus on sex addicts who have been in recovery for many years, but still struggle. This presentation focuses on the valuable exploration of loss and appreciation, two unlikely but deeply helpful ingredients for long-term recovery and greater life fulfillment.
 
90 Minute Session
Dr. Robert Weiss
Since the early 1990s, we have heard warnings about a "tsunami of problems to come" related to the extensive online exposure our children, teens, and young adults have to adult sexual images and experiences (pornography). Avoiding moral, ethical, feminist, religious, or cultural discussions about porn being good or bad, right or wrong, this clinical conversation will focus on how, why, and in what ways massive exposure to adult sexuality in all its variations is affecting our youth. What results can be tallied today from a generation just now entering their 20s and early 30s that grew up with full access to highly-charged adult entertainment (porn) as their norm? Do they have any issues or concerns? Are we facing a universal problem among our youth? Or are such challenges more along a continuum of concerns ranging from problematic relationship building to intimacy disorders like porn addiction, along with porn-acquired fetishes, kink, and paraphilias. And hey, what about us mature adults? How are we being affected by the panoply of sex that surrounds us all? This talk by international educator, author, and treatment clinician Robert Weiss PhD, LCSW, will bring you up to date on this engaging topic by looking at the changing face of sexuality among our youth, what is happening now, and where sex/tech are headed in the days to come.
 
4:30 PM - 6:30 PM: #ITalkSexualHealth Panel
90 Minute Session
Alexandra Katehakis
Co-Presenter(s)
Eli Coleman
Marty Klein
Has the upcoming addition of Compulsive Sexual Behavior Disorder into the ICD-11 finalized the debate about how to name and treat problematic sexual behaviors? This does not appear to be the case! It is important for both the public and professionals to understand the different models, why they exist and how each may have unique potential for individuals seeking help. In this panel discussion theory will be contrasted and commonalities explored. The discussion will illuminate for the audience three of the most common models for describing and treating sexual behavior problems from well-respected experts in their various fields. Join Eli Coleman PhD, Alex Katehakis, PhD, LMFT, CSAT-S, and Marty Klein, PhD as they help us understand and maneuver this extremely difficult arena.
 
Sunday, October 18th, 2020
12:00 PM - 4:00 PM: Post Conference
Post-Conference
Marty Klein
We're seeing more and more couples in conflict over one partner's porn use. The most common clinical approach to this problem pathologizes a partner's porn use while legitimizing the grievances of the consumer's partner. This violates our commitment to neutrality—and more importantly, it doesn't help the couple.

To address porn-related issues more effectively, this workshop will focus on treating intrapsychic conflicts, power struggles, and existential issues relating to porn use. We'll look at how one or both partners may be acting out body image issues; and why "porn addiction" is not a helpful concept.

We'll explore how conflict about pornography is often used to avoid confronting other relationship sexual deficits. And we'll look at various sexual issues—such as desire, arousal, and masturbation—that should be raised when working with these cases. We'll learn how to help porn consumers and their partners disclose and discuss the state of their sexual relationship, and identify specific problems they would like to address.

Finally, we'll look at our field's beliefs and standards for a moment. How do we define "sexual health" in this context? Can we honestly say we are "sex-positive" when working in this area? Do we really understand the perspective of porn consumers as well as we understand their partners? What is our vision of healthy porn use? And if we don't have such a vision, what does that say about our ability to support all of our clients?